1957 Cadillac Eldorado BiarritzSOLD

Convertible

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Exterior Color: Red
Interior Color: White
Transmission: Auto

Reference Number 125579

as of 11/10/2011

Overview
Car 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz
Exterior / Interior Color      Red 
Configuration Left Hand Drive (LHD) 
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Known History

Vehicle to be offered WITHOUT RESERVE and SOLD to the highest bidder August 18 - 20th, at Russo and Steele's 11th Annual "Sports & Muscle at The Marriott" in Downtown Monterey, California. Please contact us for more information.

 

The Eldorado model was part of the Cadillac line from 1953 to 2002. The Cadillac Eldorado was the longest running American personal luxury car as it was the only one sold after the 1999 model year. Its main competitors included the Lincoln Mark Series and the lower-priced Buick Riviera.

 

Although cars bearing the name varied considerably in bodystyle and mechanical layout during this long period, the Eldorado models were always near the top of the Cadillac line. Nevertheless, and except for the Eldorado Brougham models of 1957?1960, the most expensive models were always the opulent, long wheel-based Series 75 sedans and limousines, not the Eldorado.

 

Cadillac's completely restyled 1957 offerings borrowed heavily from the lines of the Park Avenue, a hardtop sedan "idea" car shown at the 1954 Motorama. A new X-member chassis contributed to structural rigidity as well as to a profile nearly three inches lower than before. Of course, the lack of side rails meant that the new frame afforded virtually no lateral impact protection, but Detroit wasn't particularly safety-conscious in those days.

 

Once more the Eldorado Biarritz and Seville had their own rear-end configuration. The work of Ron Hill, a talented 23-year-old design newcomer, it featured a sloped deck flanked by rounded fenders sprouting sharply pointed fins. Rear wheel openings were again skinless, and the lower rear fenders were liberally garnished with chrome. The hood ornament was eliminated, contributing to a smoother frontal appearance. Overall, the '57 was more readily distinguishable from other Cadillacs than any Eldorado since the original. Oddly enough, the dual four-barrel carburetion was dropped this year, and standard horsepower backed off slightly to 300 despite an increase in compression ratio. The all-out performance buff could still get the twin pots and 325 horses, but they now cost extra.

 

But the Biarritz and the Seville were no more than a warm-up for 1957s main event. As it had in the Thirties, Cadillac plunged into the super-luxury market with the new Eldorado Brougham, a virtually hand-built hardtop sedan on a more compact 126-inch wheelbase. Conceived largely in response to the Continental Mark II from Ford Motor Company, it came with every extra in the Cadillac accessory book -- plus a few brand-new exclusives -- but was no more successful. Price was a formidable $13,074, for which you could very nearly buy both a Biarritz and a Seville. Demand was predictably limited, and just 400 were built for the model year, all in Cadillac's own plant, by the way.

 

Inspired by Motorama show cars, the 1957 Biarritz featured exclusive rear sheet metal with American-style fins protruding from softly rounded, European-look rear fenders.

 

The rear fenders were commonly referred to as "chipmunk cheeks." This concept was used for two years, but did not spawn any imitators.

 

This Eldorado Biarritz features an optional 365 cubic inch, 325 hp V8 with twin Carter four-barrel carburetors, four-speed Hydra-Matic drive and "Sabre Spoke" aluminum wheels. List price of the Eldorado was $7,286, more than $2,000 above a series 62. Only 1,800 were built.