1967 Lamborghini P400 MiuraSOLD
See all the Images for this Car
Engine Type: 4.0 Litre 12-Cylinder
Engine Number:Stamped 1043
Color:Miura Green / Black Leather

Reference Number 206787

as of 12/23/2012

Overview
Car 1967 Lamborghini P400 Miura
VIN 1066 
Mileage 17,749 miles 
More Images
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
See all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this CarSee all the Images for this Car
Known History

 

1967 Lamborghini P400 Miura

s/n 1066, engine stamped 1043

Verde Miura with Black Leather Interior

 

Few cars have stunned like the Miura. Introduced in November of 1965 at the Turin Salon as just a naked chassis, the car created a sensation because of its radical mechanical layout. The sophisticated quad cam V12 was mounted amidships and transversely, creating a compact and balanced platform that went against almost all prior conventions about how to build fast cars. The press was sure Lamborghini was planning a race car, though in reality the car was a hastily conceived exercise to generate publicity. And generate publicity it did. Because of the huge response to the car, Lamborghini decided to build it, though they did not yet have bodywork. Bertone produced what is surely one of the most beautiful cars ever made and had a prototype ready just four months later, in time to show at Geneva in March of 1966. Orders poured in, and the plan to build perhaps fifty examples was soon scrapped. All told, over seven hundred Miuras would be built, effectively putting Lamborghini on the map, a shocking achievement considering that the firm was just three years old when the Miura was unveiled.

 

The car was then taken to Monte Carlo for the Monaco GP, drawing crowds five deep, despite the plethora of other exotic cars on hand and the jaded crowd at the casino. Legendary English journalist L.J.K. Setright took the car on a thousand mile tour of Europe for Car magazine, and called it a ‘supercar’, inventing the term that survives with us today to describe a very special automotive experience. The Miura was not dynamically perfect, but invented an entire genre of car and captured everything that was wonderful about motoring in the swinging sixties.

 

This particular car is a very early example, the 14th Miura built, and the first example painted in the now famous shade of green that is intimately tied to the Miura, simply called verde Miura or “Miura green”. This car was supplied by the factory on the 11th of May, 1967 to northwest Italy, and retains many of its unique features that appeared only on early cars. Included among these are numerous details such as the early type Bertone badges, early type safety catches for both front and rear clamshells, and wood steering wheel. The car has had extensive work by Gary Bobileff and he commented that the rivet attachment type employed on the rear louvers is representative of only the earliest cars and of a different style from most Miuras. Additionally, the car has the small Borrani wheel spinners as appeared on the very first Miura prototype. As such an early car, this example also employs the thinner gauge and lighter steel in the chassis, although this car’s chassis has been reinforced in certain areas.

 

In 2006-2007, this car had extensive work performed by Bobileff Motorcar Company, including completely rebuilt motor, transmission freshening including new synchromesh, detailing and restorative work to front and rear compartments, and complete new interior. Included in the work was the separation of the gearbox and engine to address a common Miura shortcoming. Additionally, SV-type front chassis reinforcements were installed to improve the rigidity of the chassis. The total for all this work was over $100,000 and the car is in superb mechanical condition as a result. Recently, the car received approximately $45,000 in mostly cosmetic work, also by Bobileff, which was completed in December of 2012. Included in this was a complete repaint in the car’s original Verde Miura, restoration of the knockoffs, restoration of some trim, and various minor items of sorting, including to the carburetors and ignition system to get the car in top running condition.

 

Cosmetically, the car is in excellent order, with high quality unmarked paintwork over straight, rust-free panels, all of which fit and operate exceptionally well. The trim, badges, lights, and glass are excellent throughout. The car has the correct Carello headlamps, as well as correct and difficult to find Carello twin-stalk windscreen wiper inserts. The Campagnolo wheels have been restored and the car sits on Michelin XWX tires all around.

 

Having been recently redone by Bobileff Motorcar Company, the interior is excellent too, with high quality materials and workmanship throughout. The interior is very fresh in appearance, from the headliner to the carpets, which employ the correct diamond pattern rubber heel pads. The leather on the seats and dashboard are excellent, and the instruments and controls are in equally nice shape. The dome lights work, as does the clock, which keeps good time. The steering wheel and shift knob are both wood and are nicely restored.

 

The front and rear compartments have both been restored and are extremely nice and nearly spotless. An afternoon of attentive detailing could bring both to show or near show condition. Both are quite correct, including the FIAMM stenciled airbox covers, correct blue and green finishes to the coil springs, and rubber battery cover and hold down. The frequently maimed or missing distributor cover is present and in excellent shape. A plumbed-in Halon fire system has been added, and a modern Facet fuel pump with braided lines has also been fitted to improve the reliability of the fueling system. The trunk is in excellent shape with a new gasket fitted.

 

The car runs and drives superbly, and has obviously been recently and capably set up. The engine is strong, responsive, and well-tuned, and the gearbox shifts exceptionally well, even when cold. The clutch is positive and reassuring, and the steering, suspension and brakes complete a well-rounded and coherent feel that makes this Miura a pleasure to drive.

 

This is an exceptional example of a very early Miura that has been thoughtfully updated for usability but retains its unique early features, which make it a sort of prototype for subsequent cars. Additionally, as the first Miura finished in the car’s signature color, this is a special and totally unique example of a car that is already a legend. This particular car, with paint, interior, gearbox, engine, and much other work by Bobileff Motorcar Company, widely regarded to be the preeminent Miura specialist in the US, has no mechanical or cosmetic excuses and is ready to enjoy.