1967 Jaguar E-Type Convertible 5.3L series IIISOLD
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Engine Type: 4.2 Litre Inline 6-Cylinder
Engine Number:7E11118-9
Color:Opalescent Maroon / Black Leather

Reference Number 211263

as of 2/14/2013

Overview
Car 1967 Jaguar E-Type Convertible 5.3L series III
VIN 1E14039 
Mileage 26,012 miles 
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Known History

 

1967 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 Roadster

s/n 1E14039, Engine no. 7E11118-9

Opalescent Maroon with Black Leather

 

The E-Type was unveiled in March of 1961 at the Geneva Motor Show, following the famous 11th hour disorder (one of the cars was driven to the show from England with just hours to spare). The car was an immediate sensation: its specification was state of the art, its bodywork arrestingly gorgeous, and the price surprisingly affordable. It embodied William Lyons` values beautifully and it is no surprise that the E-Type has become such a legendary part of automotive history. The specification clearly demonstrated Jaguar’s racing experience and included independent suspension all around (at a time when Ferrari was still using live rear axles), disc brakes all around (inboard at the rear to reduce unsprung weight), and of course Jaguar’s legendary twin cam inline-6. The cars were continuously developed, with the addition of 4.2 liter engine and fully synchronized gearboxes for 1965. Later cars, particularly in the United States, had safety and emissions equipment that negatively influenced both performance and aesthetics, so these Series I 4.2 liter cars are widely considered to be the pick of the bunch.

 

This particular XKE is a uniquely original example. From 1967 to 2012 the car has been in the care of just two Southern California owners, and has logged just 26,000 documented miles from new. It remains a phenomenal, unrestored E-Type Roadster with mint original interior and partially original paint. Touch up work has been performed as necessary over the years to retain a strong luster, but the car has never been fully disassembled or restored, and accordingly retains a wonderful composure. In January of 2013, a comprehensive yet non-invasive service was performed by Jaguar specialist Steve Gordon in a no-expense-spared fashion. The car runs and drives as intended by Jaguar Cars, and will not disappoint a seasoned E-Type enthusiast looking for a time capsule experience. Also of particular interest, this exact car was the basis for the Harold Cleworth’s original painting featuring an E-Type Roadster, which thousands of posters were duplicated from.

 

The car has exceedingly straight, solid, and undisturbed panels throughout. Panel match at the doors, trunk lid, and especially the engine cover to cowl are all outstanding. While portions of the paint look to have been refinished, select areas may retain the original opalescent maroon. Thanks to its longtime California custodianship, this car has never required any corrosion repairs, whatsoever. The chrome is very good throughout, and appears to be all original, with only minor aging. The front bumper over-riders have been removed. The window class is very good throughout, and the tinted windshield appears to be original. The car sits on beautiful chrome wheels.

 

The interior employs original seat, door panel, kick panel, and dash top upholstery. The top cover is original, as are the gauges and switchgear, all in wonderful condition given their age. The original wood rimmed wheel is in very good order, as are the carpets. The trunk, which is entirely original and nicely preserved, shows well, and has the pleasant smell of a truly well-kept unrestored car.

 

The engine bay and underside are largely untouched from new, but very clean and mechanically tidy. The floors, wheel arches, and rocker panels are absolutely undisturbed. The engine and driveline are quite dry, nicely detailed, and very correct to period in their appearance. This example is, of course, matching numbers.

 

The car drives as close to a new car as can be imagined. The road feel is that of a tight, responsive, and well tuned automobile. It starts easily with unusual noises or smoke, and the engine displays good power. The choke mechanism works properly, as do the gauges. The transmission has beautiful synchros, including first gear. The brakes are effective, pulling the car down straight. The recent mechanical work performed by Steve Gordon was detail oriented, as to include the mounting of 5 new tires, changing of all fluids and filters, installing new interior the dash lights bulbs, installing new trunk lid springs, adjusting the valves, installing select tie-rod bushings as necessary, along with a new brake servo, rebuilding the distributor, and replacing the exhaust down pipes and studs. In total, the recent work performed came to just under $10,000, and records are on file to confirm all work performed.

 

Included with the sale are the original tools in the original tool roll, the original owner’s manual, a wonderful set of records going back to the early 1970s, and of course one of the Harold Cleworth posters. Also included are the unrestored sun visors, and records for the recent work. In a sea of restored E-Type Jaguars, this car will appeal to the originality-minded buyer looking for a true historical artifact.