1949 Simca Huit barquette par Motto225.000-275.000 EUR - Estimate

Simca Huit barquette Motto

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French title
Chassis n° 14-50-63

- Aluminium body built in Italy
- Superb quality restoration
- Straightforward mechanics
- Entered for the 1951 Le Mans 24 Hours

Reference Number 513009

as of 1/17/2018

Dealer
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Lot 65

Artcurial - Rétromobile  Contact  Location
Salon Rétromobile Hall 1  Phone  +33 1 42 99 20 56  City  Porte de Versailles
75015 Porte de Versailles  Fax  +33 1 42 99 16 39  State  Paris
France  Mobile    Country  France France
Overview
Car 1949 Simca Huit barquette par Motto
VIN 14-50-63 
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Known History

In 1950, Jean Estager, an established driver and friend of Louis Rosier, decided to transform a Simca Eight chassis into a race car, as others had done at the time. The car was fitted with Deho-Dubonnet aluminium shock absorbers, aluminium steering box and ventilated alloy drum brakes. The 1086cc engine was prepared by Simca specialist Roger Deho. For the body of this sporty machine, Jean Estager turned to the Italian coachbuilder based in Milan, Motto, renowned for building competition barchettas. He constructed a simple, slender aluminium body, in the style of other cars that could be found on the route of the Mille Miglia.

Christian Huet has confirmed us that Jean Estager passed with the car the French administration road test (Mines n°181050) and registered the car on his name with the number 581 G 63.

In 1951, Jean Estager sold the car to Max Deblon, who wasted no time in entering his new acquisition for the Le Mans 24 Hour Race, scheduled for 23 and 24 June. Despite being entered with number 74 and the drivers Deblon-Daguet, the car didn't make it to the start line. It did participate in various sporting events, however, notably on the circuit at Montlhéry during 1953.

Rediscovered in the 2000s by Christopher Pund, the " hunter " of original automobiles, the car was found in " barnfind " condition, incomplete but still with its special chassis and original body. It was later sold to an important Delahaye collector who launched into a full restoration of the car. The engine was rebuilt and modified for racing. Bored out to 1 220 cc, it was fed by two Solex 32 PBIC carburettors on an Abarth manifold. The aluminium oil sump of 6 liter and oil filler are the original Deho ones.

This pretty barchetta is interesting for its aluminium body, shaped by hand in the Motto workshop in the best Italian sporting traditions. Our collector has left the interior of the driver's door patinated to recall the condition the car was found in. Fresh from a €100,000 restoration, this superb barchetta boasts a simple design, a light weight and reliability, advantages in historic racing that its future owner will be able to exploit.

 

 

 

Photos © Kevin Van Campenhout