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1989 Lister KnobblyPrice Upon Request

BHL 148 - 1 of 4 "Centenary Edition" Cars Built

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Brian Lister was the son of a wealthy industrialist. He, like many did, entered motor racing with his own creation and first raced an MG engined Cooper chassis in 1951. This was soon replaced by a Tojeiro chassis with an air-cooled Jap motorcycle engine. It immediately impressed and Lister seriously considered marketing the racer, although several bugs still needed to be ironed out. During one of the races in the Tojeiro-Jap, he was nearly beaten by a young Archie Scott Brown in a much slower MG TD. This was even more remarkable considering the serious birth defects the Scotsman suffered, which left him with only one fully functional hand.
Lister quickly realised that his business could move ahead quicker if he concentrated on building the cars and having Scott Brown race them. This bought Lister some time to turn his ideas for a brand new racing car into metal. Having had little experience in designing racing cars, it was not surprising that his first go at it was utterly conventional with a basic ladder frame made up of two large tubular members. Suspension was by double wishbones at the front and a DeDion axle at the rear. The relatively high unsprung weight of the DeDion axle was compensated by moving the rear brakes inboard. An MG engine was fitted and the rolling chassis was covered by a Brian Lister designed bodywork.
In 1954 the MG engine was replaced by a more powerful Bristol two litre straight six, which debuted victoriously at Silverstone, beating the more potent Jaguar C-Types. Scott Brown continued to impress on the British Isles, but he was refused an international license and for example could not take part in a Formula 1 race at Monza with Connaught. There was one F1 entry in the British Grand Prix, where he set the fastest lap, but his future lay in sports cars.
In 1955 and 1956 Lister experimented with various engines and also seriously considered Formula 2 racing. Following the devastating fire at the Jaguar competitions department in February 1957 and their subsequent retirement from international racing meant a turn for the better for Lister as the highly potent D-Type engines would become available for customers. The chassis was adapted to accept the Jaguar engine and a now legendary Lister Jaguar combination was born. Now matching the competition's power, the works Lister was easily the quickest car of the 1957 season and Scott Brown won eleven of the fourteen races he contested in, often humiliating factory machines like the new Aston Martin DBR1s and DBR2s. Understandably this success grabbed the attention of potential customers and Lister started with the production of privateer cars. To cope with the added power the chassis tubes were of a slightly wider diameter, but other than that little changed to the initial design drawn up in 1953.
The Listers were clothed in a tightly wrapped aluminium body with prominent bulges to clear the wheels, giving them the nick-name 'Knobbly'. Offered with a choice of engines; Maserati's three litre six cylinder, a three litre version of the D-Type engine and the American Chevrolet V8.
This example is one of four Centenary Edition cars built in 1989, by Brian Lister (now Light Engineering Ltd) and each car was given a proper “BHL” chassis number. The team of craftsmen, headed by three who worked on the original build of the cars in 1958. Just four cars were built using the original drawings and fitted with Jaguar engines upon completion. This car, ‘BHL 148’, moved up to the period- spec, MSA approved 5.3-litre Chevrolet V8 in 1998. Presented until 2015 in the traditional Lister colours of green and yellow, it was repainted for the 2016 season in the stunning and distinctive blue and white livery as seen here today, made famous by Lister racer, Art Huttinger of Montana; as a nod towards is American V8 power plant.
Since 1989, it has raced extensively across Europe achieving multiple Class podiums at the likes of Spa Francorchamps, Dijon, Silverstone, Le Mans. It has also raced twice at the prestigious Goodwood Members Meeting. Just last year it was driven by DK’s James Cottingham at Donington and Silverstone Classic meaning we are able to offer first hand experience of the car and its true potential unlike your regular dealers!
With the car is an extensive history file. Several letters from Brian Lister are included and an original Press booklet from 1990. Additionally the file documents the extensive race preparation and maintenance spanning 15 years by renowned specialist CKL Developments and later by Lister-Chevrolet specialists, Mark Lewis Engineering.
The stunning Lister Knobbly is on the button, ready to race and is available to view at our showrooms outside London immediately.

Reference Number 567722

as of 6/15/2019

Dealer
Go to dealer's website  

Stock Number 1041

DK Engineering - Blue Chip Selection  Contact  Location
Little Green Street Farm  Phone  + 44 1923 287687  City  Chorleywood
CHORLEYWOOD
HERTFORDSHIRE
WD3 6EA
 Fax    State  Hertfordshire
United Kingdom  Mobile    Country  United Kingdom United Kingdom
Overview
Car 1989 Lister Knobbly
Configuration Right Hand Drive (RHD) 
Transmission Manual Shift 
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Known History

Brian Lister was the son of a wealthy industrialist. He, like many did, entered motor racing with his own creation and first raced an MG engined Cooper chassis in 1951. This was soon replaced by a Tojeiro chassis with an air-cooled Jap motorcycle engine. It immediately impressed and Lister seriously considered marketing the racer, although several bugs still needed to be ironed out. During one of the races in the Tojeiro-Jap, he was nearly beaten by a young Archie Scott Brown in a much slower MG TD. This was even more remarkable considering the serious birth defects the Scotsman suffered, which left him with only one fully functional hand.

 

Lister quickly realised that his business could move ahead quicker if he concentrated on building the cars and having Scott Brown race them. This bought Lister some time to turn his ideas for a brand new racing car into metal. Having had little experience in designing racing cars, it was not surprising that his first go at it was utterly conventional with a basic ladder frame made up of two large tubular members. Suspension was by double wishbones at the front and a DeDion axle at the rear. The relatively high unsprung weight of the DeDion axle was compensated by moving the rear brakes inboard. An MG engine was fitted and the rolling chassis was covered by a Brian Lister designed bodywork.

 

In 1954 the MG engine was replaced by a more powerful Bristol two litre straight six, which debuted victoriously at Silverstone, beating the more potent Jaguar C-Types. Scott Brown continued to impress on the British Isles, but he was refused an international license and for example could not take part in a Formula 1 race at Monza with Connaught. There was one F1 entry in the British Grand Prix, where he set the fastest lap, but his future lay in sports cars.

 

In 1955 and 1956 Lister experimented with various engines and also seriously considered Formula 2 racing. Following the devastating fire at the Jaguar competitions department in February 1957 and their subsequent retirement from international racing meant a turn for the better for Lister as the highly potent D-Type engines would become available for customers. The chassis was adapted to accept the Jaguar engine and a now legendary Lister Jaguar combination was born. Now matching the competition's power, the works Lister was easily the quickest car of the 1957 season and Scott Brown won eleven of the fourteen races he contested in, often humiliating factory machines like the new Aston Martin DBR1s and DBR2s. Understandably this success grabbed the attention of potential customers and Lister started with the production of privateer cars. To cope with the added power the chassis tubes were of a slightly wider diameter, but other than that little changed to the initial design drawn up in 1953.

 

The Listers were clothed in a tightly wrapped aluminium body with prominent bulges to clear the wheels, giving them the nick-name 'Knobbly'. Offered with a choice of engines; Maserati's three litre six cylinder, a three litre version of the D-Type engine and the American Chevrolet V8.

 

This example is one of four Centenary Edition cars built in 1989, by Brian Lister (now Light Engineering Ltd) and each car was given a proper “BHL” chassis number. The team of craftsmen, headed by three who worked on the original build of the cars in 1958. Just four cars were built using the original drawings and fitted with Jaguar engines upon completion. This car, ‘BHL 148’, moved up to the period- spec, MSA approved 5.3-litre Chevrolet V8 in 1998. Presented until 2015 in the traditional Lister colours of green and yellow, it was repainted for the 2016 season in the stunning and distinctive blue and white livery as seen here today, made famous by Lister racer, Art Huttinger of Montana; as a nod towards is American V8 power plant.

 

Since 1989, it has raced extensively across Europe achieving multiple Class podiums at the likes of Spa Francorchamps, Dijon, Silverstone, Le Mans. It has also raced twice at the prestigious Goodwood Members Meeting. Just last year it was driven by DK’s James Cottingham at Donington and Silverstone Classic meaning we are able to offer first hand experience of the car and its true potential unlike your regular dealers!

 

With the car is an extensive history file. Several letters from Brian Lister are included and an original Press booklet from 1990. Additionally the file documents the extensive race preparation and maintenance spanning 15 years by renowned specialist CKL Developments and later by Lister-Chevrolet specialists, Mark Lewis Engineering.

 

The stunning Lister Knobbly is on the button, ready to race and is available to view at our showrooms outside London immediately.