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Cavallino Classic 2013 – Concours at The Breakers


1956 Ferrari 250 GT TdF s/n 0903GT

1956 Ferrari 250 GT TdF s/n 0903GT

1951 Ferrari 212 Export Touring s/n 0108E

1951 Ferrari 212 Export Touring s/n 0108E

1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe s/n 0163E

1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe s/n 0163E

1952 Ferrari 212 Inter Berlinetta s/n 0239EU

1952 Ferrari 212 Inter Berlinetta s/n 0239EU

Concours at the Breakers

Concours at the Breakers

1954 Ferrari 250 Europa GT Vignale s/n 0359GT

1954 Ferrari 250 Europa GT Vignale s/n 0359GT

1955 Ferrari 375 Plus PF Cabriolet s/n 0488AM

1955 Ferrari 375 Plus PF Cabriolet s/n 0488AM

1953 Ferrari 166 MM Oblin Spyder s/n 0300M

1953 Ferrari 166 MM Oblin Spyder s/n 0300M

1951 Ferrari 212 Export Touring Berlinetta s/n 0108E

1951 Ferrari 212 Export Touring Berlinetta s/n 0108E

1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale Coupe s/n 0163E

1951 Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale Coupe s/n 0163E

1952 Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale Coupe s/n 0257EU

1952 Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale Coupe s/n 0257EU

1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder s/n 0919GT

1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder s/n 0919GT

1953 Ferrari 250 MM PF Berlinetta s/n 0258MM

1953 Ferrari 250 MM PF Berlinetta s/n 0258MM

1955 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta TdF Speciale s/n 0425GT

1955 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta TdF Speciale s/n 0425GT

1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta TdF s/n 1039GT

1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta TdF s/n 1039GT

1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione s/n 2083GT

1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione s/n 2083GT

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder s/n 2301GT

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder s/n 2301GT

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Speciale C s/n 2429GT

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Speciale C s/n 2429GT

1957 Ferrari 500 TRC s/n 0698MDTR

1957 Ferrari 500 TRC s/n 0698MDTR

1955 Ferrari 375 America PC Coupe Speciale s/n 0355AL

1955 Ferrari 375 America PC Coupe Speciale s/n 0355AL

1953 Ferrari 375 MM PF Sypder s/n 0382AM

1953 Ferrari 375 MM PF Sypder s/n 0382AM

1969 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Speciale s/n 12925

1969 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Speciale s/n 12925

 

Palm Beach, 26th of January

This year’s Cavallino Classic was held over the last weekend in January, the “main event” with the concours at the 5 star grand hotel on Saturday. More than 20 years ago the first meeting was organized by the American Ferrari magazine “Cavallino” during the sunny winter months in Florida, over the coming years it became established as one of the major events on the concours circuit, today being one of just 7 shows whose winner is eligible for the “Best of the Best” classic award by the luxury brand Louis Vuitton. Apart from being a social event for those who spend the winter in Palm Beach escaping the temperatures in the north, the Cavallino Classic is a must visit event for all those affiliated to the marque bearing the prancing horse logo, and more than a few make the long journey south, plus a number of visitors from Europe.


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Early in the morning, soon after sunrise the first cars lined up in the driveway of the hotel, ready to enter onto the concours lawn (long before the visitors), to be prepared for the upcoming judging by the international jury. Many of the cars were driven in by the curators or restorers, rather than the owners, who joined in the proceedings later after breakfast, when the cars had been prepared, with the paint getting a last wipe, and the interior a final dusting.

The concours is basically divided into three different areas sorted by the age of the cars. The croquet lawn directly in front of the hotel is certainly the most interesting part of the show. This area is reserved for cars representing the early competition and GT history of Ferrari, at the time when the marque actively campaigned in the world sports car championship, and the street cars were still individually coachbuilt for their first owners.

When entering onto the croquet lawn, to the right there were three cars with early Belgian history imported by the late Jacques Swaters, national Ferrari importer and founder of the famous Ecurie Francochamps. Even more important, two of these cars even belonged to the Belgian Royal Family.

King Leopold III of Belgium, crowned in 1934, had been a passionate and sporting driver since his youth, and owned some spectacular cars over the years. Even after he lost his first wife in a road accident in Switzerland when he lost control of his car, he kept on buying sports cars including a Bugatti T59. This car had started life as a grand prix racer, before it was re-bodied for sports and street use, and sold to the king, finished in his favourite colour combination of black with a tan interior.

Soon after the war, Ferrari took over the role that Bugatti had enjoyed in sports car and grand prix racing, and so it is no surprise that this became the favourite marque of Leopold from that time. The first car associated with him was the Ferrari 342 America Cabriolet by Pinin Farina but equipped with a larger capacity 375 grand prix engine. He used this car for about 3 years before it was replaced by the 375 Plus seen in Palm Beach. When the King abdicated in 1951 he spent several months a year in Switzerland and for driving over the numerous alpine passes all of his cars were equipped with an altimeter, a special feature that is also found on the 375 Plus. The 375 followed the example of the Bugatti T59 that he owned, initially being designed as a pure race car, this model was successful as a works entry in 1954 both at Le Mans and the Carrera Panamericana. He was sold the last example built, chassis 0488AM, which was bodied by Pinin Farina as a one-off cabriolet, and delivered in 1955 by Garage Francorchamps in exchange for the 342 America Cabriolet. King Leopold kept this car for several years before he sold it to its second owner, and soon after it was acquired by its current owner, who has owned it for more than 40 years now. After a restoration in the early 1980s the interior was changed to green to suit the owners taste, and was featured in several books in this form. Unfortunately the car itself was rarely seen in public, but after a recent restoration by marque expert Motion Products Inc. (including re-trimming back to the original tan interior) the car made its first outing at last year’s Pebble Beach Concours where it won its class. More than a few rate this particular car at the top of the vintage Ferrari range, as it combines a successful race chassis that helped forming the myth of the marque on the track, with a very elegant one-off body by Pinin Farina plus a celebrity first owner, a combination hard to surpass. At the end of the day the judges came to the same conclusion, as this car did not just win its class again, but was also awarded Best of Show in the GT category.

Just to the right of the 375 Plus was the car of King Leopold’s second wife, Princess Liliane de Rethy. Unlike her husband’s racing chassis the Princess ordered a more conventional 250 Europa GT. However, it was not in the “ordinary” Pinin Farina Coupé style, but was also built as a one-off, this time from Carrozzeria Vignale. This coupé, chassis 0359 GT, with its white hardtop-like fixed roof giving the car a more compact appearance compared to the fastback lines of Pinin Farina’s design. The car was restored at the same shop and at the same time, so they do the concours circuit round together, reuniting the two cars over five decades after having shared the same garage. The trio of “Belgian” cars was completed by a 166 MM/53 (chassis 0300M). The car was delivered to its first Belgian owner with a Vignale Coupé body in 1953 but was soon after re-bodied by Oblin, a small coachbuilder located in Brussels. The tiny spider is finished in its period livery of matt black with a red centre line and rocker panel, just the way it was entered in various races in Belgium and France in period.

This year’s Cavallino Classic featured a number of examples from the 212 model range built as 212 Inter (odd chassis numbers indicating the intention of street usage) and the 212 Export (even numbers for race usage). No less than 5 examples where lined up on the upper lawn, with a further example in the Ferrari Classiche marquee sited further down in the vendor area. The oldest example was a 212 Export Spyder Vignale originally owned by Count Marzotto (chassis 0090E). This very elegant spider has been seen several times at The Breakers over the past few years, as it has its home just a few miles down the road in a collection in West Palm Beach. The car was joined by a 212 Export Touring Berlinetta (0108E) that had also been seen at Pebble Beach last year. The 212 Inter range was represented by no less than 3 coupés and a cabriolet. The first one was chassis 0163EL, a coupé by Vignale. The small passenger compartment with the pale accentuated roof gives the car a low silhouette compared to the prominent ornate chrome radiator grille, which was a Vignale styling feature of the time. This car had a long Portuguese history before spending almost two decades in Germany, and now it is in its new home in a prominent American collection. The second coupe was originally the 1952 Geneva Show car, chassis 0257 EU, and was the second Ferrari bodied with the later Vignale design, featuring bumperettes high on the front wings, and was exported new to the USA by Luigi Chinetti. Although it had never been to Portugal (as had the previous car), it is finished in the black and green colour combination similar to that used by the Portuguese taxis.

Also a show car back then, this time at the 1952 Paris Motor Show, the 212 Inter Cabriolet (0235 EU) was bodied by Pinin Farina, an early example very similar to the first car designed by the Turin designer, who would become the favourite stylist of the later Ferrari era. Although clearly intended for road use, with bumpers and nice chrome brightwork, the first owner took it to the 1000 km race at the Nürburgring, where it finished 9th overall. Since then it spent most of his life in the USA, when it was acquired by the current owner to be restored to former glory by Ferrari. The car has since been awarded with several concours prizes, and won an Excellence Cup for the best restoration in Palm Beach. The last of the 212 series was chassis 0239 EU, a 212 Europa Coupe Vignale. This car was used by its first owner to compete in the Carrera Panamericana in 1952 but an accident ended the race. The car was shipped back to the factory and the owner replaced it with a 250 MM. Today the car is finished in its 1952 Carrera Panamericana livery, including the characteristic colour scheme with the sponsor adverts and a sporting interior without door trim.

Every year at Palm Beach seems to be dominated by one model, two years ago no less than four 250 GT LWB California were lined up including two of the lightweight competition versions, last year four 250 GTO were lined up, and this year the 250 GT LWB TdF Berlinetta was prominent.

The long wheelbase competition version of the 250 series was built in 4 series distinguishable by the number of louvres behind the doors. The first series had no louvres and some were bodied by Zagato, followed by the 14 louvre version introduced at the end of 1956. But the design of the 14-louvre car had already been seen earlier that year on the 250 Europa GT, chassis 0425GT, the 1956 Geneva Show car, which could be classified as Tour de France prototype by Pinin Farina. This car is very interesting as it features some very unique details that never made it into the later cars by Scaglietti. The interior features double a curved dashboard that repeats the shape of the instrument nacelle in front of the steering wheel on the passenger side. Being a show car the car has some chroming on the exterior including a border around the grille with inset Ferrari badge, some refined handles both on the doors and the trunk, and indicators semi-recessed on the front wing sides. But most noticeable are the different rear fenders. Whereas the later 14-louvres are rounded at the front, 0425GT has a very angular shape and the fenders do not fall away to the rear. On the later versions the top of the fenders are slightly rounded as well but this car has a sharp edge resulting in the teardrop tail light surrounds. This car had previously been entered at last year’s Pebble Beach concours, but was not entirely finished in time, so it just did the tour but was not displayed on the lawn. At the Cavallino Classic the car was not only awarded with a platinum award, but also with the second Excellence Cup for its restoration, and the Elegance Cup for the finest coach built car.

The other three TdF were all of the last series with a single louvre. Especially the newest of them is worthy of mention, as this car (1321GT) was third overall at the 24h of Le Mans in 1959 just beaten by the two Aston Mastin DBR1 sports racing models, and winning the GT class in the process. This cover car of the December/January issue of Cavallino Magazine was seen on all four days of the meeting, as the owner raced it on both track days and displayed it on Sunday at Mar-a-Lago, earning him the “Spirit of Cavallino” trophy.

But this was certainly not the only competition car on display. Before the 250 GT was raced both in LWB and SWB configuration, the 250 MM was the car to have. The example on display, a PF Berlinetta (0258MM), competed in the 1953 edition of the Italian Mille Miglia long distance road race in the hands of its first owner, a gentlemen racer from Milan. The car ran in a few Mille Miglia Storico events about a decade ago, but it seems to need a little bit more sorting out at the moment, as it did not sound too great when fired up. After the 250 GT LWB the 250 GT SWB followed, the car on show (2083GT), an alloy competition version is also a regular entrant at the Cavallino Classic. Besides the normal SWB a few specials were built on the same chassis, one of them was on display, this being the 1961 250 GT Speciale (2429GT) with a body in the style of the 400 SuperAmerica. Besides the berlinetta versions of the 250 GT, there was also available in both chassis lengths a mechanically similar California Spider, and this year’s show featured an example of each version. Notably, the LWB (0919GT) example should be mentioned, as this car made its post restoration debut after not be seen for almost 4 decades. The car was shown on Thursday at the Jet Centre Reception were it was voted Best of Show by the attending visitors, on Saturday it was also awarded with a platinum award, and a special Judges Cup.

Centred on the croquet lawn were a 250 LM (5909) and a 500 TRC (0698MDTR).  The 250 LM was originally delivered to Luigi Chinetti’s NART, and entered in the 1964 1000 km at the Nürburgring in the hands of Maglioli/Rindt, and a little later in the 24 hours of Le Mans with Jochen Rindt and David Piper driving, but it failed to finish on both occasions. The most successful race was the 12 hours of Reims were John Surtees partnered Lorenzo Bandini to come home 2nd. After that the car was sold and repainted, but today the car is presented in the livery of the race in Reims including the race number 8. One can see that this is a trend in recent years to restore race cars to the specification on their most successful races, to make them stand out in an already small production series. The 250 LM was awarded the Competizione Cup for the fastest race car on show.

The 500 TRC has some race history in the US and in South America and was first bought by the current owner in 1983. He entrusted a (then) very young David Carte with the restoration of the car, and during the awards ceremony he said that this was the first proper restoration that he undertook, which became the foundation of his current business. Later the car was sold, only to be bought back several years later, and the restoration was freshened up again by Carte. Today this car is in immaculate condition and won a platinum award as well as the 4 cylinder trophy (although without competition) and finally the Best of Show Competition Car award.

After the display of the vintage Ferraris of the coachbuilt era and the 250 series, the middle lawn is usually reserved for the later 275 and 330 series. A special feature this year was the display commemorating the late Sergio Pininfarina, with several significant designs. Most of these cars have been seen in previous years on the upper lawn, but it was nice to see again the 375 America originally owned by Gianni Agnelli (0355AL) with its very special design, plus another of his cars, the 410 SA (1517 SA), again with unique bodywork. Then there was the very original 375 MM Spider (0382AM) that won several prizes the year before, the light blue 375 America (0293AL) and a 500 Superfast (6043 SF). Certainly the entire middle and lower lawn areas, with the later series production cars can be seen as a display for Pininfarina as he became the designer for most of these models, with something for every taste ranging from the 246 GT Dino, the Daytonas (including two Spiders) to the 512 BB and Testarossa models, or a pair of GTOs (288) to an Enzo.

So when looking over the field, one can say that in earlier years especially the upper lawn had a few more cars on display and that several cars had already been seen in previous years, but one has to keep in mind that this was the 22nd edition, and it is impossible to get 20 “fresh” cars every year. The quality of the cars was outstanding, a fact that can be easily seen by the amount of platinum awards. With the ever increasing value of the cars of the Enzo Ferrari era, only a few cars are less than perfectly restored by marque specialists both in quality and originality, unfortunately some of the owners are afraid of “destroying” their platinum award winning finish by driving them, so many of these cars are not seen on road rallies or on the race track anymore (as can be seen at the smaller entry list compared to the previous track days). Several of these cars will be seen most likely at other concours events in the near future, others will again disappear for years until they have their next outing, maybe in new ownership and in case of the race cars, maybe in a new livery.

The Cavallino Classic is always worth the trip for all those aficionados of the prancing horse, and the warm sunny weather in Florida is another good reason to escape from the cold next January for the 23rd edition of the Ferrari meeting.

Early in the morning, soon after sunrise the first cars lined up in the driveway of the hotel, ready to enter onto the concours lawn (long before the visitors), to be prepared for the upcoming judging by the international jury. Many of the cars were driven in by the curators or restorers, rather than the owners, who joined in the proceedings later after breakfast, when the cars had been prepared, with the paint getting a last wipe, and the interior a final dusting.

The concours is basically divided into three different areas sorted by the age of the cars. The croquet lawn directly in front of the hotel is certainly the most interesting part of the show. This area is reserved for cars representing the early competition and GT history of Ferrari, at the time when the marque actively campaigned in the world sports car championship, and the street cars were still individually coachbuilt for their first owners.

When entering onto the croquet lawn, to the right there were three cars with early Belgian history imported by the late Jacques Swaters, national Ferrari importer and founder of the famous Ecurie Francochamps. Even more important, two of these cars even belonged to the Belgian Royal Family.

King Leopold III of Belgium, crowned in 1934, had been a passionate and sporting driver since his youth, and owned some spectacular cars over the years. Even after he lost his first wife in a road accident in Switzerland when he lost control of his car, he kept on buying sports cars including a Bugatti T59. This car had started life as a grand prix racer, before it was re-bodied for sports and street use, and sold to the king, finished in his favourite colour combination of black with a tan interior.

Soon after the war, Ferrari took over the role that Bugatti had enjoyed in sports car and grand prix racing, and so it is no surprise that this became the favourite marque of Leopold from that time. The first car associated with him was the Ferrari 342 America Cabriolet by Pinin Farina but equipped with a larger capacity 375 grand prix engine. He used this car for about 3 years before it was replaced by the 375 Plus seen in Palm Beach. When the King abdicated in 1951 he spent several months a year in Switzerland and for driving over the numerous alpine passes all of his cars were equipped with an altimeter, a special feature that is also found on the 375 Plus. The 375 followed the example of the Bugatti T59 that he owned, initially being designed as a pure race car, this model was successful as a works entry in 1954 both at Le Mans and the Carrera Panamericana. He was sold the last example built, chassis 0488AM, which was bodied by Pinin Farina as a one-off cabriolet, and delivered in 1955 by Garage Francorchamps in exchange for the 342 America Cabriolet. King Leopold kept this car for several years before he sold it to its second owner, and soon after it was acquired by its current owner, who has owned it for more than 40 years now. After a restoration in the early 1980s the interior was changed to green to suit the owners taste, and was featured in several books in this form. Unfortunately the car itself was rarely seen in public, but after a recent restoration by marque expert Motion Products Inc. (including re-trimming back to the original tan interior) the car made its first outing at last year’s Pebble Beach Concours where it won its class. More than a few rate this particular car at the top of the vintage Ferrari range, as it combines a successful race chassis that helped forming the myth of the marque on the track, with a very elegant one-off body by Pinin Farina plus a celebrity first owner, a combination hard to surpass. At the end of the day the judges came to the same conclusion, as this car did not just win its class again, but was also awarded Best of Show in the GT category.

Just to the right of the 375 Plus was the car of King Leopold’s second wife, Princess Liliane de Rethy. Unlike her husband’s racing chassis the Princess ordered a more conventional 250 Europa GT. However, it was not in the “ordinary” Pinin Farina Coupé style, but was also built as a one-off, this time from Carrozzeria Vignale. This coupé, chassis 0359 GT, with its white hardtop-like fixed roof giving the car a more compact appearance compared to the fastback lines of Pinin Farina’s design. The car was restored at the same shop and at the same time, so they do the concours circuit round together, reuniting the two cars over five decades after having shared the same garage. The trio of “Belgian” cars was completed by a 166 MM/53 (chassis 0300M). The car was delivered to its first Belgian owner with a Vignale Coupé body in 1953 but was soon after re-bodied by Oblin, a small coachbuilder located in Brussels. The tiny spider is finished in its period livery of matt black with a red centre line and rocker panel, just the way it was entered in various races in Belgium and France in period.

This year’s Cavallino Classic featured a number of examples from the 212 model range built as 212 Inter (odd chassis numbers indicating the intention of street usage) and the 212 Export (even numbers for race usage). No less than 5 examples where lined up on the upper lawn, with a further example in the Ferrari Classiche marquee sited further down in the vendor area. The oldest example was a 212 Export Spyder Vignale originally owned by Count Marzotto (chassis 0090E). This very elegant spider has been seen several times at The Breakers over the past few years, as it has its home just a few miles down the road in a collection in West Palm Beach. The car was joined by a 212 Export Touring Berlinetta (0108E) that had also been seen at Pebble Beach last year. The 212 Inter range was represented by no less than 3 coupés and a cabriolet. The first one was chassis 0163EL, a coupé by Vignale. The small passenger compartment with the pale accentuated roof gives the car a low silhouette compared to the prominent ornate chrome radiator grille, which was a Vignale styling feature of the time. This car had a long Portuguese history before spending almost two decades in Germany, and now it is in its new home in a prominent American collection. The second coupe was originally the 1952 Geneva Show car, chassis 0257 EU, and was the second Ferrari bodied with the later Vignale design, featuring bumperettes high on the front wings, and was exported new to the USA by Luigi Chinetti. Although it had never been to Portugal (as had the previous car), it is finished in the black and green colour combination similar to that used by the Portuguese taxis.

Also a show car back then, this time at the 1952 Paris Motor Show, the 212 Inter Cabriolet (0235 EU) was bodied by Pinin Farina, an early example very similar to the first car designed by the Turin designer, who would become the favourite stylist of the later Ferrari era. Although clearly intended for road use, with bumpers and nice chrome brightwork, the first owner took it to the 1000 km race at the Nürburgring, where it finished 9th overall. Since then it spent most of his life in the USA, when it was acquired by the current owner to be restored to former glory by Ferrari. The car has since been awarded with several concours prizes, and won an Excellence Cup for the best restoration in Palm Beach. The last of the 212 series was chassis 0239 EU, a 212 Europa Coupe Vignale. This car was used by its first owner to compete in the Carrera Panamericana in 1952 but an accident ended the race. The car was shipped back to the factory and the owner replaced it with a 250 MM. Today the car is finished in its 1952 Carrera Panamericana livery, including the characteristic colour scheme with the sponsor adverts and a sporting interior without door trim.

Every year at Palm Beach seems to be dominated by one model, two years ago no less than four 250 GT LWB California were lined up including two of the lightweight competition versions, last year four 250 GTO were lined up, and this year the 250 GT LWB TdF Berlinetta was prominent.

The long wheelbase competition version of the 250 series was built in 4 series distinguishable by the number of louvres behind the doors. The first series had no louvres and some were bodied by Zagato, followed by the 14 louvre version introduced at the end of 1956. But the design of the 14-louvre car had already been seen earlier that year on the 250 Europa GT, chassis 0425GT, the 1956 Geneva Show car, which could be classified as Tour de France prototype by Pinin Farina. This car is very interesting as it features some very unique details that never made it into the later cars by Scaglietti. The interior features double a curved dashboard that repeats the shape of the instrument nacelle in front of the steering wheel on the passenger side. Being a show car the car has some chroming on the exterior including a border around the grille with inset Ferrari badge, some refined handles both on the doors and the trunk, and indicators semi-recessed on the front wing sides. But most noticeable are the different rear fenders. Whereas the later 14-louvres are rounded at the front, 0425GT has a very angular shape and the fenders do not fall away to the rear. On the later versions the top of the fenders are slightly rounded as well but this car has a sharp edge resulting in the teardrop tail light surrounds. This car had previously been entered at last year’s Pebble Beach concours, but was not entirely finished in time, so it just did the tour but was not displayed on the lawn. At the Cavallino Classic the car was not only awarded with a platinum award, but also with the second Excellence Cup for its restoration, and the Elegance Cup for the finest coach built car.

The other three TdF were all of the last series with a single louvre. Especially the newest of them is worthy of mention, as this car (1321GT) was third overall at the 24h of Le Mans in 1959 just beaten by the two Aston Mastin DBR1 sports racing models, and winning the GT class in the process. This cover car of the December/January issue of Cavallino Magazine was seen on all four days of the meeting, as the owner raced it on both track days and displayed it on Sunday at Mar-a-Lago, earning him the “Spirit of Cavallino” trophy.

But this was certainly not the only competition car on display. Before the 250 GT was raced both in LWB and SWB configuration, the 250 MM was the car to have. The example on display, a PF Berlinetta (0258MM), competed in the 1953 edition of the Italian Mille Miglia long distance road race in the hands of its first owner, a gentlemen racer from Milan. The car ran in a few Mille Miglia Storico events about a decade ago, but it seems to need a little bit more sorting out at the moment, as it did not sound too great when fired up. After the 250 GT LWB the 250 GT SWB followed, the car on show (2083GT), an alloy competition version is also a regular entrant at the Cavallino Classic. Besides the normal SWB a few specials were built on the same chassis, one of them was on display, this being the 1961 250 GT Speciale (2429GT) with a body in the style of the 400 SuperAmerica. Besides the berlinetta versions of the 250 GT, there was also available in both chassis lengths a mechanically similar California Spider, and this year’s show featured an example of each version. Notably, the LWB (0919GT) example should be mentioned, as this car made its post restoration debut after not be seen for almost 4 decades. The car was shown on Thursday at the Jet Centre Reception were it was voted Best of Show by the attending visitors, on Saturday it was also awarded with a platinum award, and a special Judges Cup.

Centred on the croquet lawn were a 250 LM (5909) and a 500 TRC (0698MDTR).  The 250 LM was originally delivered to Luigi Chinetti’s NART, and entered in the 1964 1000 km at the Nürburgring in the hands of Maglioli/Rindt, and a little later in the 24 hours of Le Mans with Jochen Rindt and David Piper driving, but it failed to finish on both occasions. The most successful race was the 12 hours of Reims were John Surtees partnered Lorenzo Bandini to come home 2nd. After that the car was sold and repainted, but today the car is presented in the livery of the race in Reims including the race number 8. One can see that this is a trend in recent years to restore race cars to the specification on their most successful races, to make them stand out in an already small production series. The 250 LM was awarded the Competizione Cup for the fastest race car on show.

The 500 TRC has some race history in the US and in South America and was first bought by the current owner in 1983. He entrusted a (then) very young David Carte with the restoration of the car, and during the awards ceremony he said that this was the first proper restoration that he undertook, which became the foundation of his current business. Later the car was sold, only to be bought back several years later, and the restoration was freshened up again by Carte. Today this car is in immaculate condition and won a platinum award as well as the 4 cylinder trophy (although without competition) and finally the Best of Show Competition Car award.

After the display of the vintage Ferraris of the coachbuilt era and the 250 series, the middle lawn is usually reserved for the later 275 and 330 series. A special feature this year was the display commemorating the late Sergio Pininfarina, with several significant designs. Most of these cars have been seen in previous years on the upper lawn, but it was nice to see again the 375 America originally owned by Gianni Agnelli (0355AL) with its very special design, plus another of his cars, the 410 SA (1517 SA), again with unique bodywork. Then there was the very original 375 MM Spider (0382AM) that won several prizes the year before, the light blue 375 America (0293AL) and a 500 Superfast (6043 SF). Certainly the entire middle and lower lawn areas, with the later series production cars can be seen as a display for Pininfarina as he became the designer for most of these models, with something for every taste ranging from the 246 GT Dino, the Daytonas (including two Spiders) to the 512 BB and Testarossa models, or a pair of GTOs (288) to an Enzo.

So when looking over the field, one can say that in earlier years especially the upper lawn had a few more cars on display and that several cars had already been seen in previous years, but one has to keep in mind that this was the 22nd edition, and it is impossible to get 20 “fresh” cars every year. The quality of the cars was outstanding, a fact that can be easily seen by the amount of platinum awards. With the ever increasing value of the cars of the Enzo Ferrari era, only a few cars are less than perfectly restored by marque specialists both in quality and originality, unfortunately some of the owners are afraid of “destroying” their platinum award winning finish by driving them, so many of these cars are not seen on road rallies or on the race track anymore (as can be seen at the smaller entry list compared to the previous track days). Several of these cars will be seen most likely at other concours events in the near future, others will again disappear for years until they have their next outing, maybe in new ownership and in case of the race cars, maybe in a new livery.

The Cavallino Classic is always worth the trip for all those aficionados of the prancing horse, and the warm sunny weather in Florida is another good reason to escape from the cold next January for the 23rd edition of the Ferrari meeting.

Text & images ... Peter Singhof www.ClassicCarPhotography.de

 

MAJOR AWARDS …

95 points or better are required to be considered for a Major Award

SCUDERIA FERRARI CUP
Best of Show Competition Ferrari ... Awarded by the Cavallino Classic

1957 500 TRC, 0698MDTR
J.W. Marriott, Jr.


GRAN TURISMO FERRARI CUP
Best of Show GT Ferrari ... Awarded by the Cavallino Classic

1955 375 Plus PF Cabriolet, 0488AM
Graseia & Wayne Golomb


FERRARI CLASSICHE CUP
Finest Factory-Certified Ferrari ... Awarded by Ferrari, SpA

1951 212 Inter Vignale Coupe, 0163E
Peter Kalikow


LA COPPA PER QUATTRO CILINDRI
Finest 4-Cylinder Ferrari ... Awarded by Cavallino Magazine

1957 500 TRC, 0698MDTR
J.W. Marriott, Jr.


LA COPPA PER SEI CILINDRI
Finest 6-Cylinder Ferrari ... Awarded by Ferrari of Ft. Lauderdale

1969 206 GT Dino, 0300
Senaga Collection


LA COPPA PER OTTO CILINDRI
Finest 8-Cylinder Ferrari ... Awarded by HMY Yachts

1985 288 GTO, 57723
Phil & Martha Bachman


LA COPPA PER DODICI CILINDRI
Finest 12-Cylinder Ferrari ... Awarded by Jet Aviation

1961 250 GT SWB Comp Speciale, 2429GT
Peter Sachs


PRESERVATION VINTAGE CUP
Finest Preserved Condition pre-1975 ... Awarded by Motion Products

1969 365 GTB/4 Speciale, 12925
Jack & Debbie Thomas


PRESERVATION CLASSIC CUP
Finest Preserved Condition 1975-1990 ... Awarded by Motion Products

1986 328 GTS, 66101
Tim Stanford


EXCELLENCE CUP-1
Excellence in Restoration Quality and Challenge ... Awarded by AIG Insurance

1952 212 Inter PF Cabriolet, 0235EU
Kenneth Roath    


EXCELLENCE CUP-2
Excellence in Restoration Quality and Challenge ... Awarded by AIG Insurance

1955/6 250 Europa GT Speciale, 0425GT
Lee Herrington


SPIRIT CUP-1
Owner Best Representing the Spirit of Track and Concorso ... Awarded by the Ferrari Club of America

1959 250 TDF Berlinetta, 1321GT
Chuck Wegner             


SPIRIT CUP-2
Owner Best Representing the Spirit of Track and Concorso ... Awarded by the Ferrari Club of America

1980 512 BBLM, 29511 
Todd Morici                                              


JUDGES’ CUP
Ferrari Most Deserving as Selected by the Honorary Judges ... Awarded by Palm Harbor Marina

1959 250 GT LWB California Spyder, 0919GT
Peter & Maria Neumark


SUPERCAR CUP
Finest 288 GTO, F40, F50 or Enzo ... Awarded by TubiStyle USA

2003 Enzo, 135872
Bob M. Cohen

ELEGANCE CUP
Finest Coach Built Ferrari ... Awarded by Silversea Cruises

1955/6 250 Europa GT Speciale, 0425GT
Lee Herrington


COMPETIZIONE CUP
Finest Track/Racing Ferrari ... Awarded by Cavallino Classic Comp

1964 250 LM, 5909
Pete Racely


GERALD ROUSH MEMORIAL CUP
Ferrari Requiring the Most Research to Restore ... Awarded by the Ferrari Market Letter

1954 250 Europa GT Vignale, 0359GT 
Jaime & Cecilia Muldoon 


Emeritus Cup
Finest on the Field as Chosen by the Chief Judge Emeritus ... Awarded by Ed Gilbertson

1961 250 GT SWB Comp. Speciale, 2429GT
Peter Sachs

 

CLASS AWARDS …

All Ferraris receiving 95 points or better receive a Platino Award
The single Oro Award requires a minimum score of 90 points
The single Argento Award requires a minimum score of 85 points.

 

Class 1:  Pre-1956 – Awarded by Jet Aviation

Platino

1951

212 Export Touring

0108E

Kevin & Tom Caulfield

1951

212 Inter Coupe

0163E

Peter Kalikow

1952

212 Inter PF Cabriolet

0235EU

Kenneth Roath

1952

212 Inter Vignale

0257EU

Mike & Jane Green

1954

250 Europa GT Vignale

0359GT

Jaime & Cecilia Muldoon

1955

375 Plus PF Cabriolet

0488AM

Graseia & Wayne Golomb

Oro

1953

375 MM PF Spyder

0382AM

Andreas Mohringer

Class 2:  250 and TRC – Awarded by Jet Aviation

Platino

1957

500 TRC

0698MDTR

J.W. Marriott, Jr.

1959

250 GT California Spyder

0919GT

Peter & Maria Neumark

1958

250 GT LWB TDF

0903GT

Peter & Kacey McCoy

1961

250 GT PF Series II Cabriolet

2489 GT

Stephen Bruno

1964

250 LM

5909

Pete Racely

Oro

1958

250 GT PF Coupe

1007GT

Peter Hosmer

Argento

1953

250 MM PF Berlinetta

0258MM

Brian & Kimberly Ross

Class 3:  275 / 330 – Awarded by HMY Yachts

Platino

1966

275 GTB

07447

Tazio De Nicolo

1965

275 GTB

07241

Skip Barber

1967

275 GTB/4

09737

Mark & Sharon Newman

1967

275 GTB/4

09517

Jay Goldman

1967

275 GTB/4

09993

Bob M. Cohen

1967

275 GTB/4 Alloy

09413

Vance & Alanna Shappley

1963

330 America

5009

Danny & Shirley Butler

1967

330 GTS

9791

Roy Brod

Oro

1967

330 GTC

10801

Richard & Angie Workman

Class 4:  365 – Awarded by HMY Yachts

Platino

1973

365 GTB/4 Daytona

15739

Vincent Vento

1972

365 GTB/4 Daytona Spyder

15417

Robert Bishop

1969

365 GTS

12455

Jimmy Page

Oro

1973

365 GTB/4 Daytona Spyder

16705

Todd Blue

Argento

1971

365 GTB/4 Daytona

14867

Chad Monnin

Class 5:  206 / 246 / 308 – Awarded by Palm Harbor Marina

Platino

1969

206 GT Dino

00300

Senega Collection

1972

246 GT Dino

04914

Al Ierardi

1974

246 GTS Dino

08308

Anthony & Ralph Giordano

1973

246 GTS Dino

05216

Steve Cantera

Oro

1977

308 GTB

21935

Julien Lundgen

Class 6:  328 / 348 / 355 – Awarded by Palm Harbor Marina

Platino

1988

328 GTS

75083

Paul W. Cissell III

1986

328 GTS

66101

Tim Stanford

1989

328 GTS

79961

Malena & Enrique Senior

1995

F355 Berlinetta

100274

Joseph M. Masessa

1997

F355 Spider

108488

Paul & Karen Skilowitz

Oro

1993

348 Challenge

94502

Jerome Jacalone

Argento

1989

328 GTS

82286

Don Taggart

Class 7:  355 / 360 / 430 – Awarded by Silversea

Platino

2002

360 Spider

127309

Bruno Perree

2003

360 Spider

133372

Mark Topley

2003

360 Spider

131115

Kenneth Geremia, Jr.

2004

360 Challenge Stradale

138444

Juan Jarrot

2005

360 F1 Spider

139755

Thomas & Carole Phiebig

2005

F430 Spider

142142

Luis Perusquia

Argento

2005

360 Spider

140346

Bert Hybels

Class 8:  365 BB / 512 BB – Awarded by Silversea

Platino

1980

512 BB LM

29511

Todd Morici

1984

512 BBi

51723

Don Bartz

1983

512 BBi

49473

David Eichenbaum

Oro

1984

512 BBi

49709

Miguel Diez

Argento

1984

512 BBi

47977

Kenneth Mathison

Class 9:  TR / 512 TR / M – Awarded by TubiStyle USA

Platino

1993

512 TR

95329

Richard Baumgart

1995

F512M

101353

Senega Collection

Argento

1992

512 TR

92002

Robert & Mona Snyder

Class 10:  550 / 575 / 599 – Awarded by TubiStyle USA

Platino

2001

550 Maranello

122758

David S. Guggenheim

2001

550 Maranello

122688

Al Ierardi

2000

550 Maranello

122515

Ivan Inerfeld

2003

575 Maranello

131989

Thomas (Ted) Johnson

2005

575M Superamerica

142022

Eugene P. Conese Jr.

2007

599 GTB

155327

William & Karen Young

Oro

1997

550 Maranello

108523

Robert & Mona Snyder

Class 11:  288 GTO / F40 / F50 / Enzo – Awarded by AIG Insurance

Platino

1985

288 GTO

57723

Phil & Martha Bachman

2003

Enzo

135872

Bob M. Cohen

Oro

1985

288 GTO

52469

David W. Raisbeck

Class 12:  2+2 – Awarded by AIG Insurance

Platino

1988

Mondial

77458

Don & Diane Meluzio

1986

Mondial 3.2 QV

62235

Rossana & Alberto Sisso

Oro

1965

330 GT 2+2

8101

Joseph Lubeck

Argento

1969

365 GT 2+2

12529

Martha Glasser

Class 13:  Speciale / SA / SF – Awarded by AIG Insurance

Platino

1961

250 GT SWB Speciale Comp.

2429GT

Peter Sachs

1955

250 Europa GT Speciale

0425GT

Lee Herrington

1959

400 Superamerica

1517SA

Robert Butler

Oro

1969

365 GTB/4 Speciale

12925

Jack & Debbie Thomas

Class 14:  Pinin Farina to 1966 – Display

Class 15:  Contemporary Production (2008-2013)