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Museo Ferrari – Inauguration of New Extension


 

Maranello, 11 June, 2013

At 11.00am on Tuesday 11 June 2013, Ferrari President, Luca di Montezemelo, officially opened the newly refurbished and extended Museo Ferrari in Maranello, accompanied by company Vice President, Piero Ferrari, and CEO, Amadeo Felisa. The Museo, or Galleria as it was originally titled, initially covered an area of 1700 square metres, and this was extended to 2500 square metres in 2004. The latest development has seen a major refurbishment of the entrance area, the boutique and cafeteria, together with a further extension of 1000 square metres, bringing the total area to 3500 square metres. Landscaping has taken place at the rear of the building, together with the provision of a patio area, for patrons of the cafeteria to enjoy in fine weather.

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The cafeteria, or to give its full title “Caffeteria Del Cavallino”, has been enlarged and provided with Poltrona Frau leather chairs and accessories, including an attractive red leather wall panel featuring Ferrari radiator grilles. The F1 simulator, which used to be in the main entrance area, has now been re-sited into a specific simulator area, and an additional unit has been provided, such has been the popularity of this feature. Other new additions are the Red Campus teaching room, where students can learn about current automobile engineering, and a conference room, which can be hired privately for conventions and social functions.

The enlarged display areas permit greater scope to have more than one themed exhibition at a time, and currently there are three running, “Ferrari Supercar, Tecnica, Design, Mito”, “From Cinecitta to Hollywood, all the Ferraris in the cinema” and “Ferrari dell’ altro Mondo, Mulotipo e Avventure”. The “Ferrari Supercar, Tecnica, Design, Mito” exhibition focuses on the Ferrari limited production supercars, which started with the GTO (288) in 1984, then the F40 in 1987, the F50 in 1995, the Enzo in 2002 and the latest offering “LaFerrari”. The exhibition also features a number of the limited production models that were the forerunners to the evolution of the supercar series. The main feature is a gallery dedicated to the development of the LaFerrari, This offers visitors a unique opportunity to see the development models, sketches etc, that led to the final production version.

The “From Cinecitta to Hollywood, all the Ferraris in the cinema” exhibition area features cars that are associated with the cinema in some way or another. There is the 275 GTB/4 which was owned and used by Steve McQueen when he was making the film “Bullitt”, and it may be recalled that he used a 275 GTS/4 NART Spider in the film “The Thomas Crown Affair” released in 1968. There is also the P540 Superfast Aperta, which was inspired by the re-bodied 330 LM berlinetta used in the film “Tre Passi nel Delirio” (English title, Spirits of the Dead), and a Mondial t cabriolet as used by Al Pacino in “Scent of a Woman”. The walls of the exhibition area are decorated with numerous images of Ferraris in films, artistically displayed in rolling film strips, whilst the adjacent cinema area has a clips from a number of films featuring Ferraris running.

The “Ferrari dell’ altro Mondo, Mulotipo e Avventure” exhibition is a fascinating display of some of the development cars from recent years, together with four of the “Tour” cars, the F355 World Tour, 612 Scagliettis from the China and India Tours, and a 599 GTB Fiorano from the Panamerican Tour. The exhibition shows the rigorous pre-production testing that takes place, together with the post production endurance testing undertaken by the “Tour” cars, over a wide variety of frequently inhospitable terrain. The “Mulotipos” offer a rare chance to see five prototype development cars in the raw, as this is the first time that they have been on public display.

There is, what at first glance appears to be a 360 Modena, but closer examination reveals that it has a F50 composite central tub, an elongated wheelbase, and alterations to the bodywork, most noticeably around the roof section, which was used to experiment with a “dual frame”, where the passenger cell was suspended on elastic blocks to suppress vibration from the rigidly mounted engine. Alongside this is the project F150, looking very “Darth Vader” in black with an ugly disguise body with plenty of taped appendages, so that while out on road test it was impossible for anybody to see what lay beneath the exterior envelope, which was what is now known as LaFerrari. Then there is another “study in black”, which appears to be a 348, which it in fact started life as, but with a 130mm extended wheelbase to house a longitudinal engine placement, rather than the transverse layout of the original car. This example has been used to test both V8 and V12 engines, with the rear body panels fixed by Dzeus fasteners for rapid access to the mechanical components. Then there are two relatively normal looking examples, a 612 Scaglietti with two massive humps in the bonnet, which was used for suspension system testing, the humps being necessary for the repositioned air filter boxes, and finally the 599 Hy-Kers car, which first appeared at the Geneva Salon in 2010, and has subsequently been used for further hybrid technology development work. This example again features a modified bonnet, this time with two large air intakes for the Hy-Kers cooling system.

The “Supercar” exhibition is scheduled to run through to 30 September 2013, the “Movies” exhibition until 31 December 2013 and the “Mulotipo” one until 28 February 2014.

Further details of the exhibitions, opening times and admission fees, can be found at www.museoferrari.com

The cars in exhibition ... more images >>>

1952 Ferrari 500 F2 monoposto (Campione del Mondo) - 4 cilindri in linea

This is the single-seater in which Alberto Ascari won Ferrari its first World Title in 1952. He also delivered the second the following year. Ascari thus became the first Ferrari World Drivers’ Champion and the only Italian ever to win both F1 titles for Maranello.

1962 Ferrari 250 GTO - V12

Probably the most famous of all Ferrari cars, the 250 GTO was built for races from 1962 to 1964. With just 36 vehicles produced, all of which are still running, the 250 GTO ruled on the track and on the road, winning three GT Constructors International Championships. GTO stands for the category it raced in: in order to compete, a minimum of 100 vehicles had to be built in a year. When the Federation granted homologation as an evolution of the short-wheelbase 250 GT, it automatically became the 250 GTO, i.e., the homologated GT (GT Omologata). It proved to be invincible with its 2953 cm³ V12 engine, an evolution of the “Colombo project”. It featured 300 hp, high torque even at a low rpm and 5-speed transmission, which represented a major innovation for the period. Another two key factors that contributed to the success of the 250 GTO were its light dry weight of just 880 kg and its superior agility. Today its value has rocketed to over USD 20 million.

1962 Ferrari 250 Berlinetta (SWB) Competizione "The Breadvan" - V12

The Breadvan’s story is a very interesting one. This berlinetta is extreme both in terms of its forms and its technical content. It was commissioned by the Count Volpi di Misurata to compete against the 250 GTO. Developed by Giotto Bizzarini and Piero Drogo on the same running gear as the 250 SWB, the car looked more like a racing van than a racing car, as its square shape was the result of experimental aerodynamic styling. It was quickly dubbed the “Breadvan” by the British Press. Fast but unblessed by fortune, it raced several times including Le Mans. However, Enzo Ferrari was against it because he would tolerate no rivals for his unbeatable 250 GTO. In 2010, Ferrari awarded the Breadvan the Attestation for Vehicles of Historic Interest, a document issued for Ferraris which, although do not comply with the strict Ferrari Authentication criteria, are deemed to be of historic interest thanks to their competition and/or recognised international show history. The Breadvan is probably the most iconic example of this kind of car.

1963 Ferrari 250 LM - V12

Presented at the Paris Motor Show in October 1963, this was the berlinetta version of the 250 P prototype, sharing the same chassis and running gear with just minor modifications. The FIA’s refusal to homologate it as a GT car damaged its sales potential and the decision forced the car to compete with true prototypes, thus decreasing its chances of victory. On the other hand, it did extend the life of the 250 GTO on the racing circuits.

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO '64 - V12

Probably the most famous of all Ferrari cars, the 250 GTO was built for races from 1962 to 1964. With just 36 vehicles produced, all of which are still running, the 250 GTO ruled on the track and on the road, winning three GT Constructors International Championships. GTO stands for the category it raced in: in order to compete, a minimum of 100 vehicles had to be built in a year. When the Federation granted homologation as an evolution of the short-wheelbase 250 GT, it automatically became the 250 GTO, i.e., the homologated GT (GT Omologata). It proved to be invincible with its 2953 cm³ V12 engine, an evolution of the “Colombo project”. It featured 300 hp, high torque even at a low rpm and 5-speed transmission, which represented a major innovation for the period. Another two key factors that contributed to the success of the 250 GTO were its light dry weight of just 880 kg and its superior agility. Today its value has rocketed to over USD 20 million.

1966, 275 GTB4 - V12

Steve McQueen bought this car, now restored by the Ferrari Classiche Division, when he was filming Bullit, 1968.

1969 Dino 246 GT - V6

The Dino 246 GT was an evolution of the Dino 206 GT, with a larger V6 engine and a wheelbase lengthened by 60 mm. Apart from the longer body, the design was virtually identical, with just a longer engine cover and a repositioned fuel cap. The car proved commercially very successful, and three series were produced during its life span. When production stopped in 1973-4 demand was still high.

1981 Ferrari 126 CK - V6 Turbo

The 126 CK marked Ferrari’s return after a 31-year absence of turbo engines in Formula 1. The engineers initially experimented with the Comprex but eventually plumped for a 120° V6 with twin KKK turbos. The result was a car that although it retained several of the solutions used on the 312, had a different aerodynamic configuration. Gilles Villeneuve took two victories, one in Monte Carlo and one in Spain, in the 126 CK

1984 Ferrari (288) GTO - V8 Turbo

Designed for Group B races, the 288 GTO project dates back to 1983. In Maranello, the 308 was used as the starting point for the project. The steel chassis was reinforced and work was done on the wheelbase, axle tracks and wheel size. A radical approach was taken for the biturbo V8 engine, with two heat exchangers, just like a F1 car, and the aerodynamics were improved by adding large spoilers. The car was unveiled in 1984 as an on-road vehicle, since the Federation did not hold any Group B races. It was a resounding success, and instead of the planned 200 vehicles, production reached 272 units (which is nonetheless a small volume). This makes it rare and quite expensive today.

1985 Ferrari F1 156-85 - V6 Turbo

It was the first racer fully designed in Maranello with the CAD/CAM system and was rich in new contents. The name suggested a lot of features, like in many other models, since 1 and 5 indicated the capacity (1500 cm³) and 6 the number of cylinders. The car won the Canadian and German Grands Prix with Alboreto, while Harvey Postlewhite was the technical manager of the team, role previously occupied by Mauro Forghieri for 23 years. Ferrari ranked second in the Constructors’ Championship, also with the help of Swedish driver Stefan Johansson, who replaced Arnoux after the second race of the season.

1986 Ferrari CART (Indy) - V8 Turbo

his single-seater developed for the America CART series had a brief yet ill-fated life. Built as an experiment to evaluate Ferrari’s chances of realising his dream of winning the Indy 500, it never actually raced. However, the technicians directly involved in the project all felt it could indeed have acquitted itself with honour. Sadly, the car was shelved and then later loaned to Alfa Romeo which used it when building engines for the American classic. It laid forgotten for some years in a Milanese warehouse, but was later renovated and returned to Maranello.

1986 Ferrari (288) GTO Evoluzione - V8 Turbo

The amazing commercial success of the GTO immediately highlights the possibilities that a road model with a strong sports personality can offer. This was the start of what went on to become the F40. The GTO Evoluzione has never raced and has remained a prototype.

1987 Ferrari F40 - V8 Turbo

The unexpected success of the 288 GTO revealed the huge potential for on-road cars built using the avant-garde technologies developed for racing. Unveiled at the 1987 Frankfurt Motor Show, the minimalist passenger compartment features only what is strictly needed for driving. The chassis is made from steel incorporating composite materials and Kevlar. Characterized by the large rear spoiler, the bodywork too is made from composite materials. The 478 hp biturbo engine, 80 hp more than the GTO, can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in 4.1 seconds, with a maximum speed of 324 km/h, simply phenomenal for the time. Although it was announced that only 400 vehicles would be produced, the success was so overwhelming that Ferrari had to build 1315 cars over five years!

1989 Ferrari Mondial T Cabrio - V8

A blind Al Pacino drives this car around the blocks of New York in Scent of a Woman, 1992.

1989 Ferrari F40 Competizione (LM) - V8 Turbo

The design characteristics of the F40 represent a natural opportunity for development of a racing model. Ferrari importers, who had traditionally participated in endurance races over the years, find a solution to this need in the model developed by the specialist Michelotto, who had already made significant contributions to Ferrari including development of the 365 GTB4 Competizione for Rally racing. The car was created in 1989, but development continued until the end of the 1990s with record results.

1989 Ferrari F1-89 - V12

The John Barnard-designed F1-89’s main innovation was an electro-hydraulic gearbox as it introduced steering wheel-mounted controls for the first time on a single-seater. 1989 was also Nigel Mansell’s debut year for Ferrari. Flanking Gerhard Berger, he won in Brazil, Hungary and Portugal.

1990 Ferrari F1-90 - V12

The abbreviation of the 1990 racer was 641, the name of the body project, then it was called simply F1-90 to continue the tradition of previous years’ racers. The most evident technical novelties of the project were the torsion bar suspensions, which were held to be the best type available. In the meantime, Alain Prost had entered the Formula One team and won in Brazil, Mexico, Germany and France, where he obtained Ferrari’s victory no. 100 in Formula One.

1994 Ferrari F333 SP - V12

The F333 SP marked Ferrari's return to what was once known as sports-prototype racing, a category in which Ferrari built much of its reputation. Tangible proof of the Company's renewed determination to enable customers to race their own cars, this sports-prototype disputed its first races in the American IMSA Championship. The powerful V12 engine and the sophisticated chassis allowed the car to enjoy a long career, notching up successes on racing circuits all around the world.

1995 F50 - V12

The 50 in the name of this model represents the 50th Anniversary of Ferrari, which fell in 1997. The model was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in 1995 and was designed together with the latest Ferrari Sport, built in Maranello: the 333 SP. The inspiration for this new milestone in Ferrari technology came once again from the world of Formula 1: a perfect combination of a carbon-fibre bodyshell and a V12 engine, just like a race car. In addition, like a F1 car, the bodyshell carries the entire rear axle. The vehicle's design was extremely original for the time and features a removable hardtop that can be lodged on board. With only 349 vehicles produced, the F50 is much sought-after by collectors.

1995 - 2000 Ferrari Mulotipo F140 sviluppo motori (V8 e V12)

Based on a 348 chassis with a 13 centimeter longer wheelbase to house the V8 engine of the 360 with a longitudinally-positioned gearbox instead of the transverse one of the 348. The same lengthened chassis was used for the first roller bench testing of the Enzo V12 engine. Lately, it has been used for tests on the recently manufactured V8 engine. The rear panels of the bodywork have quick fastenings to make it easier to access the mechanics.

1997 Ferrari 355 GTB World Tour - V8

The 50 in the name of this model represents the 50th Anniversary of Ferrari, which fell in 1997. The model was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in 1995 and was designed together with the latest Ferrari Sport, built in Maranello: the 333 SP. The inspiration for this new milestone in Ferrari technology came once again from the world of Formula 1: a perfect combination of a carbon-fibre bodyshell and a V12 engine, just like a race car. In addition, like a F1 car, the bodyshell carries the entire rear axle. The vehicle's design was extremely original for the time and features a removable hardtop that can be lodged on board. With only 349 vehicles produced, the F50 is much sought-after by collectors.

1999 Ferrari F1 F399 – V10 (Campione del Mondo Costruttori)

After a 16-year, Ferrari won back the Constructors’ title with Michael Schumacher, Eddie Irvine and Mika Salo. The Finn replaced the German for six races after he was injured in an accident at Silverstone. Schumacher had started the season on a winning streak at Imola and Monte Carlo, and returned for the last two grands prix to help the team and Eddie Irvine who was still in with a chance of the Drivers’ title. After a win in the opening race in Australia, the Irishman also won in Austria, Germany and Malaysia but lost out on the title in the final race.

2000 Ferrari F1-2000 – V10 (CWorld Constructors’ and Drivers’ Champion)

Both Constructors and Drivers’ Titles finally arrived with Michael Schumacher’s 10 victories, after a long 21-year wait. The Scuderia deliv
ered those results with the F1-2000, a car that performed brilliantly on the track. Its main technical innovations were a lower centre of gravity and new materials.

2001 Ferrari F1 F2001 – V10 (World Constructors’ and Drivers’ Champion)

The design of the F2001 was underpinned by a whole new design philosophy. In part due to new regulations, its aerodynamics were modified: it had a lower nose, a higher-mounted front wing assembly and longer flanks. Its engine, the 050, was weight-bearing and longitudinally mounted as was its titanium-encased gearbox while the signature periscope exhausts were retained at the rear. The season got off with Schumacher making a victorious debut in Australia, followed by a one-two in Sepang. The season ended with 9 wins, guaranteeing Ferrari both titles.

2002 Ferrari F1 F2002 – V10 (World Constructors’ and Drivers’ Champion)

The F2002 delivered 15 wins in 17 grands prix as well as 9 one-twos and 10 pole positions. Ferrari had won the Drivers’ Championship by Magny-Cours giving Schumacher his fifth title, while the Constructors’ title was ensured by Budapest. Despite its apparent similarity to the F2001, the new car had been completely redesigned to improve its performance. It had a new, significantly lighter chassis while its flanks, radiators, exhausts and whole rear section had been restyled to boost aerodynamic efficiency and improve engine cooling. The new 051 engine was mated with a far less bulky cast titanium gearbox casing also. Great attention was given on optimising weight distribution too.

2002 Ferrari Enzo - V12

The Enzo dates back to the years of consecutive victories at the Drivers’ and Constructors’ Championships. It was 2002, and the name of the new model served as a promise of excellence. Inspired by F1 even in the design, the Enzo was the first on-road vehicle with a “manettino” selector on the steering wheel to alter handling depending on the route and road conditions. The lightweight and compact V12 engine and the vehicle dynamics systems react to these commands just like a race car, with selectors on the steering wheel. The system was developed from the technique used by Schumacher to change the car setup in every bend, requiring commands capable of adjusting car setup several times during the same lap. This is how the modern F1 steering wheel and the manettino, as the Team and driver called it, were developed.

2003 Ferrari F1 F2003-GA – V10 (World Constructors’ and Drivers’ Champion)

The superiority of the Scuderia Ferrari and Michael Schumacher in the 2002 season led FIA to change the rules, particularly with regard to qualifying, testing and the points scoring system. However, the season was a battle to the last and ended with Ferrari taking both the Drivers’ Title (Schumacher’s 6th title, beating Fangio’s record) and its 5th consecutive Constructors’ Championship only at the end of the last race at Suzuka.

2004 Ferrari F1 F2004 – V10 (World Constructors’ and Drivers’ Champion)

The F2004 was Ferrari’s 50th single-seater. Known in-house as the 655, it was an evolution of the concepts already debuted in the F2003-GA: aside from a more downward-inclined nose, most of the other significant work was done at the rear.

2004 Ferrari Mulotipo F131 Dual Frame - V8

This was based on an F360, where a passenger compartment based on the F50 and suspended on elastic blocks weres added. The aim of the experiment was to combine an extremely rigid chassis-load-bearing engine unit, with a passenger compartment insulated from the effects of noise and vibrations. The project was shelved because the results did not meet up to expectations. Work was carried out on the two prototypes, one with a V12 engine, between 2000 and 2005 with a number of long road tests.

2005 FXX - V12

The FXX is the fruit of Ferrari's know-how in building special limited-series sports cars combined with its racing experience. It provides the basic framework on which the specifics of future extreme models will be worked out. The FXX is powered by an imposing 6,262 cc V12 engine that can punch out over 800 hp at 8,500 rpm. Its gearbox is the result of the transfer of F1 strategies, delivering gear change times of under 100 ms. This is almost as fast as the F1 single-seaters, themselves the absolute pinnacle of current technological achievement.

2005 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti China Tour - V12

Two 612 Scagliettis driven by over 60 international journalists, who took turns at the wheel every 1500/2000 km ,completed a tour of the whole of China from the deserts of Mongolia to the high plains of Tibet, the ancient silk route and its tropical coasts to discover a world that was even less well known at the time than it is today.

2006 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano Panamerican Tour - V12

From Brazil to Argentina and Chile to Peru through the Andes to Panama and Central America before crossing the United States of America and reaching Canada, the two 599 GTB Fioranos, stars of the Panamerican Tour, showed that they could adapt to any situation, no matter how incredible it was.

2006 Ferrari Mulotipo F137 su base 612 sviluppo sospensioni - V12

The chassis of this 612 Scaglietti has been designed and built to house the new concept suspension of the present Ferrari range. The bumps on the lid are due to the need to reposition the engine intake filter boxes to house the front shock absorber attachments required by the new suspension geometry. Today, the whole Ferrari range uses a system that has been experimented on various tracks including the classic Nurburgring.

2007 Ferrari F1 F2007 – V8 (CWorld Constructors’ and Drivers’ Champion)

The F2007 gave Ferrari both World Titles once again (with Kimi Räikkönen crowned Drivers’ Champion). Its design was the Scuderia’s interpretation of the technical regulations that came into force in 2007. These focused mainly on safety with more aggressive front and rear crash tests and the inclusion of a composite lateral protection structure around the driver’s sides. These modifications resulted in a car that was about 10 kg heavier.

2008 Ferrari F1 F2008 – V8 (World Constructors’ Champion)

The F2008 gave Ferrari its 16th Constructors’ Title. The single-seater design was heavily influenced by the rule changes that year which included the introduction of the Standard Electronic Control Unit (SECU) for all teams. There were also modifications to rules governing gearboxes, safety and materials. All of this led to the car’s weight increasing, the elimination of a string of driver aids, and simplified differential, engine and gear-shifting management.

2008 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Magic India Discovery Tour - V12

Defying the roads, traffic and unpredictability of India, with international journalists taking turns behind the wheel, this was a long journey to discover the remotest parts of an amazing country. As with the other tours, even in the most difficult landscapes, the Ferraris did not encounter any problems.

2009 P540 Superfast Aperta - V12 – One Off

One-off model made for a collector and inspired by the 330 LM in the film Spirits of the Dead, 1968.

2009 599XX - V12

The 599 is not officially a Supercar, but the XX version definitely belongs to this elite category, for both technical and symbolic reasons. Ferrari has an extraordinary tradition of creating high-performance front-engine vehicles. The 250 GTO is the most significant of these, but it is not the only one. It is interesting to see two berlinettas, both so technologically advanced and with outstanding track performance, exposed side by side, even if separated by 50 years. At its debut, the 599XX broke the lap record on the famous and challenging "Nordschleife”, the 22.8 km version of the Nürburgring track.

2010 Ferrari Mulotipo F150 M8 Hy-Kers - V12

This is one of the hybrid power train development mules used to create “LaFerrari”. Based on a specially modified F458, the V12 Hy Kers power train was installed complete with two high voltage battery electric machines, power and control electronics and cooling systems. The 2650 mm wheelbase is the same as the LaFerrari. The result was achieved by redesigning the whole of the rear in terms of chassis, fuel tank and systems without modifying the volume of the bodywork. The camouflage, which is deliberately ugly and obviously unfinished, has been added to make it difficult to understand exactly what work is being done on which vehicle. Fernando Alonso helped with the whole cycle of “LaFerrari” tests.

2010 Ferrari Mulotipo 599 Hy Kers - V12

After being presented at International Motor Shows, the vehicle was used in experimental development to test the main electric machine (electric motor) paired with a dual-clutch transmission. Compared with the original bodywork of the 599 GTB Fiorano, the engine compartment lid has been modified to reflect the changes in the cooling system needed for the Hy-Kers system. This system has been designed to be used on vehicles with front and rear engines.

2011 Ferrari F150 modello di stile “MANTA” 

2011 Ferrari F150 modello di stile “TENSOSTRUTTURA”

2012 Ferrari F150 modello di lavorazione stile 

2012 Ferrari LaFerrari modello di stile interni 

2012 Ferrari LaFerrari modello definitivo Hy-Kers - V12


Keith Bluemel         
06/2013