Goodwood 79th Members’ Meeting - They Thought of Everything


Patrick Blakeney-Edwards discusses the race with fellow drivers

Patrick Blakeney-Edwards discusses the race with fellow drivers

Porsche 962C s/n GTi 106B, Porsche 962 s/n 962-087 & Porsche 962 s/n 962-010

Porsche 962C s/n GTi 106B, Porsche 962 s/n 962-087 & Porsche 962 s/n 962-010

Her Majesty's Constabulary warms up

Her Majesty's Constabulary warms up

1962 Jaguar E-type Fhc takes tighter line than 1964 AC Cobra (Graham Hill Trophy)

1962 Jaguar E-type Fhc takes tighter line than 1964 AC Cobra (Graham Hill Trophy)

6.75 Litre Roll-Royce Ghost, taxi for House Captain Emanuelle Pirro

6.75 Litre Roll-Royce Ghost, taxi for House Captain Emanuelle Pirro

Over-night magic on 1960 Sebring Sprite by expert engineers

Over-night magic on 1960 Sebring Sprite by expert engineers

1964 AC Cobra

1964 AC Cobra

Wigwams shelter after successful rain dance

Wigwams shelter after successful rain dance

A.F.P. Fane Trophy (all Frazer Nash) Start

A.F.P. Fane Trophy (all Frazer Nash) Start

Ferret competitors introduced

Ferret competitors introduced

1967 Iso Grifo 5.4 Litre s/n GL730138D

1967 Iso Grifo 5.4 Litre s/n GL730138D

 

After a much-delayed journey, owing to localised fuel shortages north of London, I eventually got to the Goodwood Circuit at a time well after the middle of Practice. If truth be told, it was towards the end. At least in the early morning I had seen some of the laps from home, as streamed live to my computer. Therefore, the typical friendly Goodwood Members’ Meeting atmosphere was apparent, given the introductory descriptions by the commentary team.

For those who are unaware, the Members’ Meeting is less of a flamboyant ‘Festival’ than the early Autumn Goodwood Revival, but without some of the period razzmatazz of 40s-60s themes and attire worn by the public and competitors, it is still very, very, popular and has a unique ambiance of its own. Just as friendly, just as many excellent races and varieties of cars to see, but with fewer restrictions for the public in terms of special ticket corporate areas or sold-out grandstands. There were also cars and motorbikes which would go beyond the cut-off year of 1966, when the Goodwood circuit last closed its gates for competitive racing, as experienced at the Revival.

So, making straight for one of the undoubted highlights, just to get a perspective of the cars themselves, was my first priority. This being the gathering together, as a 40th anniversary and celebration, of the Porsche 956 and 962 sports racing cars. They were very familiar during the 1980s in the Group C era and had fantastic success at Le Mans, and other sports car series around the globe, from the United States across to Japan. In fact, I heard a statistic that of all the 956/962s built, which were relatively few in number (despite a varied ‘customer’ programme), there were 177 recorded drivers competing in them at high profile sports car races in period.

I’d always wondered how you could visibly tell the difference between a 956 and a 962, as they look so similar. It is well known that regulations changed for safety reasons in that drivers had to have their feet behind the axle to protect them in frontal impacts, so the 956 metamorphosed, almost imperceptibly, into the 962. However, again from the one of the senior Goodwood commentators, I learnt the quick solution: And this was that a 956 had a narrower panel between the front of the door opening and the beginning of the front wing. Whereas, on the 962, there was a slightly wider panel, by some four or five inches (in my photographs, there are examples to show this visually).  However, most apparent on arrival, was that there were lots of both types present!


© 2022 John Godley

More than I’d ever seen before…perhaps more than anyone else had ever seen, including those that made the annual trip to the Le Mans 24hrs. In fact, in two different paddock areas, I counted a total of twenty. A couple of these were in the familiar Red and Yellow colours of the Shell Oils and Dunlop sponsorship (one of those ‘Joest’ prepared cars victorious at Le Mans in consecutive years, 1984 and 1985). But the most familiar liveries being the Blue and White Rothmans Tobacco sponsored ‘Works’ cars, famously piloted by Jacky Ickx and Derek Bell, among several others, like Mass, Bellof, Holbert and Haywood.

Quite astoundingly, for me, there were no less than ten of these cars present. Surely that must have well exceeded any gathering of Rothmans Porsche 956/962s, in the same venue, ever? Their spirited high speed parade laps were much anticipated, especially as the Saturday evening light began to fade, and they were brought, one by one, out onto the main Goodwood grid. Marshals parked them in typical Le Mans echelon style and the atmosphere became palpable. It seemed although Goodwood’s track has many of its own merits, we were actually transported back to France and a balmy evening at the Circuit de La Sarthe. There were so many smiles, such happy chattering, cameras flashing and general ‘bon vivre’ around these cars, that the vast majority of the public, still behind barriers were itching to get nearer. When the gates were opened, they flooded onto the tarmac and surrounded each one, getting close up, perhaps like never before…And within seconds, there seemed thousands of people. I don’t think I have ever seen Goodwood’s Pits Straight so full of human beings.

At the centre of it all was a man who owned half of them. A historic racer, specialist Jaguar E-type dealer and car collector in his own right, Henry Pearman was largely responsible for this gathering. And what a terrific job Henry had done. I even went across to thank him personally, as did others, and I think he was excited about how well the evening was progressing, with all these magnificent cars, as much as anybody else. When the grid was eventually cleared and the Porsches set off for their laps, they began increasing speed as the headlights were beginning to shine brighter. There wasn’t a cacophony of noise as these machines - as I understand it - were not only quite easy to drive but proved they were a great deal quieter than others of their era, and certainly all Formula One counterparts. Typical German Teutonic efficiency, advanced engineering and every component designed and positioned exactly as it should be, for optimum performance. These cars were super quick, but achieved all their success in quite an understated way.

And after that, with a couple of initial races preceding the evening highlight - one the first half of the Gerry Marshall Trophy and the other the first half of the Mike Hailwood / Barry Sheene Trophy for 250cc/350cc and Formula 750 motorcycles - there was time to walk around the inner and outer parts of the Goodwood premises. Like many thousands who stayed well beyond twilight, simply to enjoy and experience disparate facets of fun put on for the evening’s entertainment. As well as bars, restaurants and other eateries there was a funfair, a large stage with musicians and singers, plus acrobatic dancers mingling with the crowds. Orange fires at the centre of bench circles could be seen dotted around in many locations. These being provided in order to keep people comfortable in the cooler night temperatures, with the flickering fires on braziers giving not only warmth, but an ethereal, slightly surreal, image of the whole occasion.

Undercover, you would find a café barn and bar with country music, hay-bale seating and thousands of decorative daffodils. Another offered a tremendous choice of hot dishes and beverages from independent specialists, glowing softly under hundreds of huge orange filament bulbs. Then a third was a grand but traditional school refectory, with jazz orchestra, honours boards, the four House flags and vast hanging insignia like a medieval banqueting hall, with candelabra illuminating row upon row of parallel benches. No-one needs ever go hungry…let alone become dehydrated.

Wandering back through the Paddock in darkness, I met father and son, competitors Chris and Charles Clegg. Chris I’d known for many years since he used to race an Aston DB4 and a Sebring Sprite at AMOC meetings. Now Charles was at the wheel of his own Sebring Sprite which, I was advised, had experienced a problem in practice, concerned with differential and oil seal maladies, but when I saw his car, it was completely in bits: The whole front was removed and the engine was out. Three gentlemen in overalls were on their knees studiously working on what looked to be a very long and intensive job. Chris told me that only during the late afternoon, when they were considering that the car had to be retired owing to such serious mechanical problems, these gents, who were unknown to the Clegg family, came along and offered their services. Gladly accepting the help, modest motor engineers Rob, Dave and Dom simply began taking the car apart. They were obviously proficient in all matters Sebring Sprite.

Next morning when I caught up with Charles, his car was back in one piece, he was ready to race in the Weslake Cup and he advised the fantastic mechanical experts had worked through to about midnight. That was the true spirit of Goodwood and best illustrated the camaraderie amongst teams at the Members’ Meeting. Nearby were many of the brightly coloured ‘pop-art’ style paintings of Tim Layzell. He was ‘minding the shop’ this weekend as even his little TVR Grantura MkIII, a lightweight and only 1.6 litres, was well outside the boundaries of the diminutive Weslake Cup cars.

Now, with all the practicing and qualifying having taken place on Saturday, there was a full day’s schedule of races intermittently spaced, with the Porsches coming out once again and an equally popular demonstration of Formula One V10 naturally aspirated cars from the mainly ‘90s decade, some of which had been driven to glory by the three times World Champion Ayrton Senna. Appropriately his nephew, Bruno, was on hand to fully demonstrate and personally enjoy his uncle’s McLaren-Honda MP4/6, as head of the two dozen cars also occupying the F1 grids of that era.

I took the opportunity to walk down to Madgwick corner to view a different perspective of the high-speed action and for the first time my little camera was able to get a few shots of the Porsches in focus (not achieved so well in the semi darkness during the evening before). Just as the commentary team was discussing how reliable these cars had always been in period, one of the Rothmans 956s slowed right down and parked opposite me. Out stepped Anthony Reid, one of the Goodwood House Captains, in his light blue and white striped racing suit, reminiscent of a team captain’s blazer, and calmly watched the others lapping by, a few more times to the flag. I don’t know what the problem was, but it did appear minor and Mr. Reid was unfazed.


© 2022 John Godley

Earlier on, back in the Paddock, a second striped blazer House Captain had emerged from his taxi. This, a brand new 6.75 Litre Roll-Royce Ghost, for Emanuelle Pirro and family, which was among various other opulent R-R Cullinans, Bentley Bentaygas and Porsche Taycans silently cruising between Goodwood House, VIP hotels and the inner pathways of the circuit. Either that or the nearby town of Chichester had the most expensive set of mini-cabs on the planet.

I continued round the perimeter of the circuit in the opposite direction to the tractors giving rides to spectators, thinking that I needed some proper exercise. Two point four miles was the circuit length and using geometry and the mathematical term Pi (“π”) with comparable diameters, worked out that walking around the public pathway and boundary road would probably add another quarter, or third, of a mile. So, the whole journey would still be a little less than three miles, but no hurry. Out came the ‘60s GT cars for the Graham Hill Trophy, which was again one of the personal highlights. I’d talked to James Cottingham an hour beforehand who mentioned that he and Harvey Stanley were probably the third quickest paring in their Cobra, although for this year with some new suspension related regulations, the extremely quick and powerful Cobras were a little restricted in overall performance, primarily so that the less potent Jaguar E-types could maintain equivalent pace throughout.

Anyway, as the race progressed there were battles right through the field, although a safety car period was necessary in the middle. Once they got going again and the cars resumed high-speed appearing from behind, and over my right shoulder, I’d reached St. Marys. This, the only left-hand corner of the Goodwood track (apart from the ‘jink’ left after the chicane), and immediately beside me I glanced over to see two pirouetting front runners, in unison, slide off the tarmac harmlessly onto the grass. One was said Cobra of Mr. Cottingham, and the other was the Italian American Bizzarrini-Chevrolet piloted by father and son, David and Olivier Hart. Young Olivier had been quite a star in recent years, ably demonstrating his car control and natural talent - possibly along the lines of a fellow Dutchman currently at the peak of Formula One - but it seemed he shared a little bit of similar exuberance. Certainly on this occasion, having darted down the inside to overtake James, and the two had collided. The Bizzarrini front wing hit the Cobra’s rear corner, hence they were both sadly needing to retire as a result. If I had been walking in the opposite direction, I’d have seen this coming and possibly then been able to get a decent shot of both cars facing the wrong way. Err…but I didn’t!

When the race had concluded, after another spin in nearly the same place, where podium position Sam Hancock’s car had been visibly ejecting steam or fluid underneath and he spun 360 degrees on his own liquid, the result became a fine victory for the ‘semi-light’ E-type of Minshaw and Keen. New rules had indeed worked for them! But, throughout the perimeter walk there was some shelter, if needed. No rain dances performed, so the sun remained bright, and only Hancock’s tyres got wet. However, just in case a shower had hit, some substantially accommodating Wigwams or Teepees were positioned intermittently round the exposed banking, each having their own braziers and benches within, ready to counter even a potential chill in the air. I could well see how this had evolved into ‘Glamping at Goodwood’.

In the break between races, I went over to watch a few of the sideshows. Not being disingenuous to these, they were minor entertainments and chances for the public to participate in their own right. They could earn points for their respective Goodwood Houses, much as the car drivers did, by taking part and competing against each other in various fun activities. First of all, there was clay pigeon shooting although, in these modern times, the clay pigeons were plastic discs and the guns were firing electronic beams, like lasers.

Right next door were some proper air rifles, used for the objective of shooting crows on the ground. However, although the pellets were real, and the guns looked after by gentlemen who seemed very likely to be ex-armed forces, actual crows with feathers were far too smart to be in the firing line of such high velocity weapons, so these were tin metal silhouettes which could be flattened when hit. The crows themselves were untroubled on the other side of the road, feeding in a much quieter field.

The third countryside pastime, available to the spectating public was Ferret racing! Yes, and with real ferrets. This was particularly popular and the novice trainers or ‘encouragers’ were all children. The master of ceremonies for this event had a good rapport with the crowd and introduced the competing ferrets, one by one, to the audience many of whom may have not seen such an animal ever before. I, for one, didn’t realise quite how big they were, ‘in the fur’. To me, best described as the size of cats, but obviously with shorter legs. These ferrets were assembled in their own little holding boxes, or stalls, much like greyhounds, and then released to run down tunnels and long plastic tubes encouraged throughout the route by their young enthusiastic personal trainers. At the end of the tunnel, and effectively the finishing line, there would be a welcome saucer of milk for each ferret to refresh themselves.

After the race, with the crowds beginning to disperse back into the surrounding area and prepare for some more slightly faster action on track, we heard above the miscellaneous low-key conversations one quite plaintive cry from a youngster who, in no uncertain terms, informed his parent, “Mumm, I Wonner Ferret!” Now, that’s not a request you hear every day, is it?

Further on, I passed a very well-behaved chestnut brown dog with a jacket on his back stating “Explosive Search”. The circuit authorities had made sure all potential hazards were covered and contingencies looked after. Of course, there was nothing for the very placid young canine to sniff out but, thankfully, when talking to his master it became apparent that Max the dog was unbothered by the screaming V10s of the Formula engines shrieking by within a few yards. Like their noses, dogs’ eardrums are vastly more sensitive than human beings, but Max wasn’t troubled…which was good to hear!

I continued round the rest of the perimeter and once reaching the outside of the Woodcote corner found a gymnasium construction, in which various other sporting and exercise opportunities awaited spectators who wished to earn more points for their House in a more physical manner. I didn’t venture in myself, but nearby were a group of people in differing states of colourful dress, throwing tomahawks at upright planks, quite some distance beyond. Again, not an everyday sight. This was officially titled ‘Adult Axe Throwing’ and each participant was given half a dozen axes to hurl at wooden targets. As they spun through the air most would embed themselves quite heavily, with those being nearest the centre of circular targets, gaining the most points, of course. Once again, this sight was certainly a first for me, but nonetheless intriguing.


© 2022 John Godley

After a break for lunch it was then time to immerse myself into more of the automotive action. I made for the assembly area of the Varzi Trophy, which consisted mainly of Alfa Monzas, Bugatti Type 35s and French blue Delage/Delahaye/Talbot-Lago cousins. Once more, such a gathering you’d never see elsewhere on these shores. Later on, an even more unique spectacle was an entire grid, full of chain-driven Fraser Nash cars, from the decade between 1927 and 1936 in the inaugural ‘A.F.P. Fane Trophy’. The first of its type for the Members’ Meeting at Goodwood. In previous years we’d seen two or three, as well as the unique and very rapid ‘Owlet’, being the only saloon Frazer Nash of this type known, but here again there were more than two dozen of its open top sisters.

Another more eclectic collection, this time from the 1950s, were the saloon cars competing in the Sopwith Cup. A few familiar ones, such as the three big Mk VII Jaguars and a couple of even larger Stateside machines in the form of Cadillac Coupe and Lincoln Cosmopolitan, but from the front of the grid, and a sight that I’d never even imagined seeing before, were a pair of turquoise and cream cars of relative obscurity, certainly in competitive terms. Pole position was a Nash Metropolitan and beside it a Standard Vanguard Six.

Unfortunately, as the starting flag fell, the Nash was left static on the line though, miraculously, every car behind managed to spot the obstruction at the last second and pass by without accident. The Vanguard disappeared somewhat, off into the distance, but within a couple of laps the Metropolitan driver, sometimes on three wheels, was making his way through the mid-field. Towards the end he was up to third place where in his path an imposing, wallowing Jaguar, like a ship in high seas. He was finally able to overtake this quickest of the Mk VIIs, driven by actor and comedian Rowan Atkinson. British readers in particular will know that Rowan has been at the forefront of British television and film comedy for well over 30 years, in roles such as Johnny English, Blackadder and the infamous Mr. Bean, plus the more serious role of French detective, ‘Maigret’, but he’d also been racing as a ‘gentleman driver’ in Historics, mainly Aston Martins, for a similar few decades. Although the Nash did get into second place it wasn’t able to catch the winning Standard, but Mr. Atkinson was absolutely delighted with third position. And later he confirmed it was his very first podium finish, since he’d begun enjoying motorsport from behind the wheel.

Ironically, as I’ve been writing this, on a pair of terrestrial television channels Rowan is featuring in two different programmes simultaneously, and a third had been on the week before. However, another nice thing about Goodwood is that on occasions he could be seen walking around the paddock and other public areas, unhindered by those that might otherwise be wanting photos or autographs. He could enjoy the Members’ Meeting as an ordinary enthusiast, like everybody else, which was particularly good to see. Other modest cars in this unique bunch, not in the forefront of race goers’ minds, included a Renault 4CV, a Peugeot 203, a Borgward Isabella and a Saab 93B. Variety was certainly the spice of life here.

I’d also taken the opportunity to go out into the public car parks to see what other miscellaneous classic gems were among the thousands of more modern forms of transport. Far fewer in number, it has to be said, than previously seen at the Revival, but nonetheless those that stood out a mile, were very worthy of close inspection. A good example was an extremely rare, righthand hand drive, Iso Grifo. One of only 26, I believe, and this 1967 version had the slightly smaller 5.36 litre Chevrolet engine, rather than the later 7 litre, but looked more pleasing on the eye, without the ungainly square bonnet bulge of the larger capacity cars.

As I’d walked towards it, I saw a florescent orange jacketed official observing me intently from the middle distance. So, I took the opportunity to divert and approach him directly, thus alleviate any concerns that I may be about to steal the Iso. I initiated some friendly conversation by opening with, “Not so many of the classic cars brought for this event, compared to those numbers in early September.” To which he rather abruptly responded with, “It’s not the Revival.” In my own mind I was most grateful to him, and any doubt which I may have harboured that I was actually not at the 79th Members’ Meeting, was put to bed. For, even after a day and half in the midst, it still might not have occurred to me I was not really visiting the Goodwood Revival, after all. Possibly, in his mind, I’d appeared perplexed. Anyway, he was satisfied that I had no adverse intentions, and I wandered away to find some other interesting cars. Among those worth a photograph, as you’ll see by the accompanying pictures, were a Renault Caravelle and FIAT 124 Sport both 1968 vintage, then a 1962 AC Greyhound near to a 1928 Lancia Lambda, as well as (on the banking), a 1974 Bitter CD, a 1975 AMC Hornet and a 1984 Bristol 412. None of these would you ever be likely to see on a UK high street, and they were still very rare in their contemporary heydays.

However, an even more impressive group of cars, these being for sale, were assembled both in the substantial structure forming the Bonhams tent, as well as a similar number squeezed rather tightly surrounding its edges on the outside. Again, highlights for me included several rarities: One of the seven original Series 1 V8 Lagonda 4-doors, which were built resembling the 2-door Aston Martin V8s of the 1970s period, but were never sold in such numbers, of course. This one sold for £276,000. Another was a lightweight (with enlarged engine) DB4 as prepared for racing by RS Williams, though the example here had all its competitive outings over in the United States (and it sold for just under £236k).

Then there were several more Astons, Jaguars, a couple of Facel Vegas, some Bentleys, three Ferraris and various other Italian marques. One of these, a Maserati, matched a counterpart English AC with quite similar characteristics in design, both being styled by Pietro Frua. Here, one superseded the other by two years, as Bonhams had both; a red Maserati Mistral and a same colour AC 428 Coupé. So it was interesting to compare the commonalities between the pair. The ’67 Mistral departed for £82.8k, the ’69 AC for £92k.

Furthermore, there was an open topped white Maserati Mistral as well, one of the highlights of the auction, which sold for £299k. This was actually the catalogue’s cover car. The centre-piece of the room was a Force India-Mercedes Formula One car from 2011, although minus the engine and gearbox. (Therefore, demonstrably suitable for shows, it fetched a little over £86k.) Outside in evidence were examples of Porsche and Lamborghini. But the two vehicles parked together were agricultural tractors more suited to fields and farm yards than motor circuits. Perhaps brand bargains for impressing friends in rural pubs, new owners ploughed their wallets for £26.5k on the Porsche’s behalf and a much shallower furrow of £11.3k for the Lamborghini.

Bonhams, overall, were very pleased with the result of the sale as 91%, of lots on offer, found new homes. Some of the other major sales included: An Aston Martin DB5 for £506k, a Ferrari 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer for £253k, an Alvis 4.3-Litre Short Chassis Dhc for £241.5k and an AC Ace Roadster for £200.1k (note: all figures gross).


© 2022 John Godley

The final race of the weekend was the second half of the Gerry Marshall Trophy, the day before won by the partnership of Jack Tetley and Alex Buncombe in their very powerful Chevrolet Camaro Z28. One among five, in fact, with two contemporary fastback Mustang Boss 302s in the mix as well. These American Goliaths seem to be increasing in popularity with Goodwood’s historic community although the combined British squadron of smaller Capris, Escorts and tiny Minis certainly held their own in terms of performance and close racing. However, this time driving solo in the Sprint, Tetley provided a masterclass in balance on the limit, with precision and smoothness, to secure himself a double victory.

Preceding that, the most powerful vehicles of all to race over the weekend had been the early Can Am cars in the Surtees Trophy which mainly consisted of Ford GT40s, Lola T70 Spyders and McLaren M1s. For much of this, veteran campaigner and expert preparer Rob Hall was leading a very competitive group of followers, in his McLaren M1A, but towards the latter stages was closely shadowed by Oliver Bryant in his Lola T70. As they came upon back markers to lap them in the final tour, it appeared that Hall would navigate through and retain premier position, with Bryant still in tow, but Olly had other ideas. Both drivers squeezed every last ounce of performance and grip, matched their late braking into the slowest curve and through Woodcote, with all cars retained on track without damage. But Bryant finally inched ahead as they reached the single car width chicane, and Hall conceded. Just as Jack Tetley had greatly impressed, Mr. Bryant a while earlier, most certainly did the same.

This effectively rounded off a fantastic weekend of track action as well as fine weather, great politeness and friendship amongst all those present; teams and spectators alike. I recalled another lovely touch from the Goodwood planning team had been that Saturday evening. In the main grandstand opposite Woodcote overlooking the chicane, which enabled spectators to view without special tickets, blankets were offered and distributed to those who might like to keep warm as the temperature was dropping. Again, where do you see blankets, or any complimentary covering, given out at a motor racing event? These, and the little radios with earpieces, provided with each purchased Programme. Therefore, spectators could thus keep in touch with the official commentary and maintain updated information and results throughout the day, yet not disturb the people around them and remain mobile.

When I was about to leave trackside for the final time, I could not resist taking a shot of Ed Foster, the hard-working commentator and interviewer, as he tucked into a small tray of fish and chips. The clock right above him showed it was now 7pm. I apologised to Ed and he confirmed that this was the first chance he’d had for proper refreshments with something to eat, throughout the whole day. So, indeed, it was well deserved. As I departed the boundaries of the circuit, the fire braziers were still providing warmth to various individuals, two of which were gentlemen from Her Majesty’s Police Constabulary. They had enjoyed a trouble-free weekend and whilst still on duty they were happy for me to take a photograph of them, on a short break. Half past seven on a Sunday evening and regretfully time to make for home, but thankfully, it was to be a less-hindered 160 miles and a faster journey.

So, finally concluding, I draw your attention to the section of photographs showing the variety of ambient scenes, in addition to those of the cars and the Bonhams auction lots. There was so much to see, I missed quite a bit of the racing myself, therefore to advise readers who would like a true insight into the competitive action throughout the weekend, currently, much of it is available on Goodwood’s YouTube channel.

For the first time, in confirming some facts, now back at my desk, I glanced at my pristine Programme, sadly to notice the outer spine had come away from the internal pages…Only it hadn’t. What was held safely filling the intentional gap was a sharpened Members’ Meeting pencil, so thoughtfully provided for keen spectators (as hundreds would routinely do in the ‘olden days’), to fill in the lap positions and results of every race: Perhaps this ultimate attention to detail is a, simple but most fitting, way to sum up the whole ‘79MM’ Goodwood experience!

© 2022 John Godley
Classique Car Conduits